10ER Speed Changer and Belt Tensioning

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Majones1
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Location: San Diego, CA

Re: 10ER Speed Changer and Belt Tensioning

Post by Majones1 »

Installed the new belt and the speed adjustment appears to work correctly. Since belt tensioning is as much art as science I am still getting a feel for the belt movement, but the motor is sufficiently raised from the boards that I can more easily make the adjustment. I think I'm beginning to get a little quicker at it.

As for the headstock pulley wobble, I removed the pulley to see if it or the shaft was the problem and I found the shaft has a significant amount of scoring and a long flat spot filed into it for the set screw (see photos below). From photos of other shafts I haven't seen any scoring or a set screw flat. I would not think the flat would affect the pully position since the set screw would be pushing the pulley away from that flat when tightened. I found the unscored section of the shaft to be the correct 13/16" O.D. and the I.D. of the hole in the pulley to be 1/64" larger. This pulley is keyed (see photo below), unlike other headstock pulleys I've seen, but it IS smooth so this was not what scored the drive shaft.
Drive Shaft Img 1.jpg
Drive Shaft Img 1.jpg (224.97 KiB) Viewed 101 times
Drive Shaft Img 4.jpg
Drive Shaft Img 4.jpg (186.98 KiB) Viewed 101 times
Drive Shaft Img 5.jpg
Drive Shaft Img 5.jpg (183.77 KiB) Viewed 101 times
Headstock Pulley.jpg
Headstock Pulley.jpg (169.04 KiB) Viewed 101 times
I found the O.D. of the scored part of the drive shaft to be 99/128, which is 5/128" smaller than the unscored part of the shaft. Since that's a hair more than 1/32", and the left side of the pulley sits on the unscored section of the shaft, it's possible this is what is causing the wobble, which makes the floating sheave clack back and forth on its shaft. Note that the clacking is from the oilite bearings banging into the speed changer chassis on the right and the knurled knob on the left. I suspect this is not really dangerous nor causes serious damage, but will likely result in some extra wear on the moving components. It just makes a lot of noise, which could mask other problems that arise, and makes it sound dangerous to me. I would appreciate input on my assumptions from you more experienced SS users.
Marc Jones

Proud owner of a Model 10ER s/n: 72883 (resurrected by mickyd in 2009/10)
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chapmanruss
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Location: near Portland, Oregon

Re: 10ER Speed Changer and Belt Tensioning

Post by chapmanruss »

Marc,

The three things I see going on in you post and pictures above is

1. There is excessive scoring on the Drive Shaft as you point out.

2. The pulley is not an OEM Pulley but a Motor Pulley bored out to fit the 13/16" Drive Shaft and is slightly oversized.

3. Is your description of the of the Speed Changer Pulley Assembly having a
clack back and forth on its shaft. Note that the clacking is from the oilite bearings banging into the speed changer chassis on the right and the knurled knob on the left.
Items 1 & 2 appear to cause the Drive Pulley wobble and to correct it may need an OEM Pulley and if that doesn't completely cure the wobble than replace the Drive Shaft with an undamaged/non-scored one. Item 3 is the oilite bearings being worn and replacing those would eliminate the "clacking" back and forth. Looking at you previous post with the picture of the Pulley Assembly the gap between the oilite bearing and the knurled knob is clearly visible and indicates worn bearings. Without correcting the Drive Pulley wobble and replacing the oilite bearings it will only get worse.
Russ

Mark V completely upgraded to Mark 7
Mark V 520
All SPT's & 2 Power Stations
Model 10ER S/N R64000 first one I restored on bench w/ metal ends & retractable casters.
Has Speed Changer, 4E Jointer, Jig Saw with lamp, a complete set of original accessories & much more.
Model 10E S/N 1077 oldest one I have restored. 10E S/N 1033 & Mark 2 to be restored.
Majones1
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Location: San Diego, CA

Re: 10ER Speed Changer and Belt Tensioning

Post by Majones1 »

Russ, thank you for pulling all that together. Just after I found the scoring on the drive shaft, I saw that a drive shaft came available on eBay, and it was just up the coast from me. The cost was low so I bought it, should arrive in the next couple of days. They said the bearings would need to be replaced, but I read in Mickyd’s refurb write up that all the bearings on my tool were good, so I’m planning on just moving them over.

I’ll look for the correct pulley and get new oilite bearings for it. My 10ER should then purr, right? I can’t wait!

I really appreciate all the help.
Marc Jones

Proud owner of a Model 10ER s/n: 72883 (resurrected by mickyd in 2009/10)
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chapmanruss
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Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2014 8:16 pm
Location: near Portland, Oregon

Re: 10ER Speed Changer and Belt Tensioning

Post by chapmanruss »

The Drive Assembly Bearings are pressed on and are a tight fit. Use caution when removing the good bearings from the old shaft and putting them on the new one. You don't want to ruin the good bearings. They should be pushed off and on by the inner race only.
Russ

Mark V completely upgraded to Mark 7
Mark V 520
All SPT's & 2 Power Stations
Model 10ER S/N R64000 first one I restored on bench w/ metal ends & retractable casters.
Has Speed Changer, 4E Jointer, Jig Saw with lamp, a complete set of original accessories & much more.
Model 10E S/N 1077 oldest one I have restored. 10E S/N 1033 & Mark 2 to be restored.
Majones1
Gold Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2021 1:11 am
Location: San Diego, CA

Re: 10ER Speed Changer and Belt Tensioning

Post by Majones1 »

Russ, thank you for the bearing replacement suggestions. You can never be too sure what I may know or not know, so I definitely appreciate being warned of the dangers. Although I have a long employment history as a computer tech, having begun as an Navy Fire Control (weapons systems computers) tech back in 1980, I have a little longer history dealing with bearings, although that experience was intermittent, and it’s been several years since I last had to press any on or off.

I received the “new” drive shaft assembly with the bad bearings still pressed on, which means it also included the aluminum spacer between the two bearings. Using previous discussions on replacing these bearings that I found on this SS forum and my nice Harbor Freight bearing puller, I easily pulled the bearings. I think one of the bearings may actually be OK, but the one closest to the pulley shows an impression on the rubber seal that looks like someone placed an object with a rounded edge directly onto the rubber and put significant force. That bearing is completely bound up. They either didn’t know how to remove bearings, or mounted something that put a lot of continuous force against that bearing.

Anyway, I found a little bit of rust on part of the exposed shaft, so I soaked it in rust removal fluid for a few hours (along with the badly rusted metal parts of the SS wood turning tools Mike gave me). I pulled them out before I went to bed last night and they were all rust free, so I dried them off and sprayed a little WD-40 on them to prevent any oxidation before I could get back to them today.

I also pulled the drive assembly from my headstock yesterday and found those bearings to be in excellent shape, they look like new, so I will pull them later this morning and get those installed on the “new” drive shaft. This new pulley shaft looks almost perfect, with maybe three small set screw marks on the small OEM-milled flat. I still need to get either the correct OEM headstock pulley or see if I can get one of Skip’s pulleys, but I am glad to have an unscored pulley shaft now. I’ve been watching the eBay and Craigslist listings in my region quite a bit now, since I got my SS, so I was surprised to see this drive shaft assembly appear just when I needed one and I felt I had to jump on it. Part of me felt I would have been smarter to just buy one of the more complete SS’s for $150 as a parts bin to save money over time. But then, that kind of negates the whole space saving feature of having a SS.

I’ll let you know how things work later today, and will try to include some photos of the bad bearing and new shaft. Thanks again for your help.
Marc Jones

Proud owner of a Model 10ER s/n: 72883 (resurrected by mickyd in 2009/10)
Majones1
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Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2021 1:11 am
Location: San Diego, CA

Re: 10ER Speed Changer and Belt Tensioning

Post by Majones1 »

Rather than visiting the SS forum yesterday I ended up using my limited free time to focus on making sawdust; I'm getting close to finishing my first woodworking bench. OK, to be fully honest, I did post about THAT in the "Beginning Woodworking" forum. Being a novice, I'm a bit proud of the work I've done on the bench, even if there are a couple of rough areas (mostly hidden).

Yesterday morning, before I got into working on the bench, I did install the drive shaft I purchased on ebay. I moved the good bearings from my 10ER to the new shaft, installed it, and found the pulley still wobbled. I was not surprised. With this good drive shaft I am able to determine that the pulley is not bored straight through, its more of a cone. I thought I might use a single shim around the shaft to fill the space, but it seems that the hole at the small pulley end is smaller than the other end, and the pulley still wobbled. I ended up with what I consider to be a very temporary fix. I folded two small pieces of aluminum heating duct tape in half and wrapped it nearly halfway around the side of the shaft opposite from the set screw, but this was inserted only at the large pulley end of the hole. The pulley now does not wobble, and when the belts are tensioned properly, the SS does not make the loud clattering. The sliding sheave on the speed changer no longer bangs back-and-forth on the oillite.
New Drive Shaft 1 sm.jpg
New Drive Shaft 1 sm.jpg (160.41 KiB) Viewed 20 times
New Drive Shaft 2 sm.jpg
New Drive Shaft 2 sm.jpg (208.95 KiB) Viewed 20 times
I believe the belts are tensioned correctly, but I've noticed the headstock pulley does get warm. I felt the exposed bearing and it seems to be warming up. I am not 100% sure I have everything installed correctly, I put it back together the way I found it, but it seems to me that there is nothing really holding the bearings, especially the exposed bearing, into the headstock. There is the cast aluminum piece between the bearings that is held in place with the set screw, but I don't think it is really putting pressure on either bearing, and the outside race of those bearings don't appear to be tightly seated into the headstock. Can there be something wrong here? Did I need to do something additional to ensure these bearings' outside races are firmly in place?

Below are photos of each side of the bad bearing. In the first you can clearly see the indentation in the rubber seal.
Bad Bearing 1.jpg
Bad Bearing 1.jpg (216.56 KiB) Viewed 20 times
Bad Bearing 2.jpg
Bad Bearing 2.jpg (222.42 KiB) Viewed 20 times
Marc Jones

Proud owner of a Model 10ER s/n: 72883 (resurrected by mickyd in 2009/10)
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