New owner, want to restore

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Chad
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by Chad »

edma194 wrote:Take them off the spindles. They're each attached with your 5/32" set screws. A 5/32" allen wrench is your Shopsmith toolbox. Then soak them in Evapo-Rust. Definitely the best way to remove rust for small items.
Or white distilled vinegar.
Chad
  • ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    1963 Shopsmith Mark V "Goldie" 1-1/8 hp Serial # 379185
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    1994 OKUMA LB15 II OSP7000
    2017 OKUMA LB3000 EXII SPACE TURN MY OSP P300
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JPG
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by JPG »

edma194 wrote:Take them off the spindles. They're each attached with your 5/32" set screws. A 5/32" allen wrench is your Shopsmith toolbox. Then soak them in Evapo-Rust. Definitely the best way to remove rust for small items.
AMEN!!!! Soak with set screws(black oxide ones) out.

P.S. Vinegar is acid(albeit a weak one).

Evaporust works so well and so fast and removes NOTHING but rust(no base material).
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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Chad
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by Chad »

True, white distilled vinegar is a acid (regular grocery store is weak), but it will not hurt the base material (in this case steel). It will remove the rust, and turn the steel a dual black finish (similar to a dual black oxide finish). Plus, it is not toxic. Naval jelly also works well, but a bit more difficult to apply to small, hard to access areas.
Chad
  • ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    1963 Shopsmith Mark V "Goldie" 1-1/8 hp Serial # 379185
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    1994 OKUMA LB15 II OSP7000
    2017 OKUMA LB3000 EXII SPACE TURN MY OSP P300
ShoptimusPrime
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by ShoptimusPrime »

I'd recommend evaporust over anything else. Take them off and soak them in a plastic bottle cut in half. Come back in 30 mins or an hour or even them next day and your done. The stuff is amazing. You can get it on your hands and it won't burn you like navel jelly, and after you're done with your current part you can put it back in the jug and use it again and again. I have been using my original gallon jug for over a year now and it is still going strong. I just got done soaking the way tubes on my second full restore/restoration. The tubes only took 2 hrs to get completely free of rust.

I'd also recommend taking apart the headstock and giving it a thorough cleaning after you are familiar with using it. Bill Mayo has a great upgrade to the speed control module. I've used it on three headstocks and about to upgrade a forth. Helps keep the worm gear in the center of the "pork chop." I also find it useful to take apart the speed control assembly and clean and wax the backside of the dial and headstock. It helps to reduce friction and sawdust build up. Waxing the paint on the headstock also helps with keeping sawdust from piling up. Johnson's paste wax is going to be used a lot in keeping your shopsmith working great. I picked up a digital tachometer from harbor freight to adjust the speed controller after taking it apart. I think they are less than $20.

If the quill is a little sticky it might need a good cleaning and waxing. The channel in the headstock can also be gunked up with old wax or grease. I've had to clean several headstock's where axle grease was used and it hardened. Just make sure to carefully and slowly release the tension on the quil. 3 or 4 turns should be about right to reset the tension when you reinsert the quill.
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everettdavis
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by everettdavis »

edma194 wrote:Take them off the spindles. They're each attached with your 5/32" set screws. A 5/32" allen wrench is your Shopsmith toolbox. Then soak them in Evapo-Rust. Definitely the best way to remove rust for small items.
That’s exactly what I would do. Evapo-Rust is even available at Harbor Freight. It is re-usable. Just pour it through a good coffee filter after you clean your parts and store it in a different sealed container.

You can use it over a number of times.

Part should be free of oils, buildups, and loose rust. Clean it and lightly brush off rust scale with a soft brass brush. Then use Evapo-Rust and it will last longer.

Cover it when soaking parts. The Evapo portion of the name tells you it will evaporate faster if not covered.

Everett
ghouliegirl
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by ghouliegirl »

I finally had a minute to do some work, and though I was able to loosen the set screw on the top spindle, I am not able to get the hub off, and I can't turn the screw at all on the bottom hub. I'm guessing probably also due to rust. What's the best way to get those things moving? WD-40? Spray with evapo-rust? Silicone spray? I can't get them to budge one iota.
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BuckeyeDennis
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by BuckeyeDennis »

You need some penetrating oil for that job. Regular WD-40 is not a substitute, although they do now have a penetrating oil called "WD-40 Specialist Penetrant". PB Blaster is good stuff, and generally easy to find locally at hardware stores and such.

Apply it to all the seams and down the set screw holes, and let it soak for a day or three, replenishing as it soaks in.
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JPG
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by JPG »

Fill the set screw hole with evaporust.

let it work over nite.

Get a new GOOD quality allen wrench.

Apply extra torque with a longer 'lever arm'.

'Might' work. ;)

If not there are other 'tricks'.
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
edma194
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by edma194 »

Lightly tap on the hubs once in a while to help get them loose after you use the penetrating oil. Tap lightly! You're trying to get them to vibrate, not knock them loose.
Ed

Mark V 510 with PowerPro headstock, Mark V Greenie with 510 headstock, Mark V 500 in progress
Sawsmith 2000 Ultra, 10ER in progress, 10ER undetermined future
ShoptimusPrime
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Re: New owner, want to restore

Post by ShoptimusPrime »

I might try sewing machine oil and let it sit for a day or two. I like the suggestion of putting evaporust in the screw hole as well. If it doesn't move after that a few light taps might be in order. For the bottom, use a socket to apply even pressure on the hub as you tap. Use an old 2x4 or other "soft hammer" to do this, a steel hammer will have to much momentum and you might risk damaging the bearings.

Resist the urge to use a wrench or channel locks to force it off. Might be able to make a set of wooden wedges you can force on the sides of the hub to apply pressure against the back cover and push the hub off a little.
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