Bandsaw blade drift myths

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BuckeyeDennis
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Bandsaw blade drift myths

Post by BuckeyeDennis »

My understanding of "blade drift" problems when resawing on a bandsaw has just been greatly enhanced.

Check out this video from Stockroom Supply. I've seen mixed reviews on their "Little Ripper" ripping-sled product, but this video was certainly an eye-opener for me.

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algale
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Re: Bandsaw blade drift myths

Post by algale »

I agree, very interesting!
Gale's Law: The bigger the woodworking project, the less the mistakes show in any photo taken far enough away to show the entire project!

edma194
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Re: Bandsaw blade drift myths

Post by edma194 »

I've seen other info about the problems that a fence causes as the stress in the wood is relieved. Using an old style SS bandsaw table with a miter gauge in the cross slot makes a short fence that doesn't extend past the blade leaving the wood free to move after it's cut. So far this has worked out pretty well for me. My past experience with other bandsaws taught me that tension was critical but I think the Shopsmith alignment system on the 11" bandsaw works very well for fine blades.

Another thread mentioned using a simple pin as a guide and adjusting for drift as you go, but I'd guess having drift when the wood is unrestricted sort of points to other problems. A dull blade is often a problem, and I think mainly because it doesn't go dull evenly on both sides. Whenever one side of the blade cuts better than the other the it will want to turn as it cuts. I've seen the suggestion to even out blades by holding a whetstone up against one side of the blade as it runs, but that just seems like an easy way to wreck a blade to me so never tried it.
Ed

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BuckeyeDennis
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Re: Bandsaw blade drift myths

Post by BuckeyeDennis »

edma194 wrote: Sun Nov 22, 2020 2:24 pm I've seen other info about the problems that a fence causes as the stress in the wood is relieved. Using an old style SS bandsaw table with a miter gauge in the cross slot makes a short fence that doesn't extend past the blade leaving the wood free to move after it's cut. So far this has worked out pretty well for me. My past experience with other bandsaws taught me that tension was critical but I think the Shopsmith alignment system on the 11" bandsaw works very well for fine blades.

Another thread mentioned using a simple pin as a guide and adjusting for drift as you go, but I'd guess having drift when the wood is unrestricted sort of points to other problems. A dull blade is often a problem, and I think mainly because it doesn't go dull evenly on both sides. Whenever one side of the blade cuts better than the other the it will want to turn as it cuts. I've seen the suggestion to even out blades by holding a whetstone up against one side of the blade as it runs, but that just seems like an easy way to wreck a blade to me so never tried it.
That's a good point about using the miter gauge as a short fence. I have the old-style table, but when ripping I invariably mount a full-length auxiliary fence to the miter gauge. I like the added height of my auxiliary fence, but now I'm thinking that I should make a shorter one.
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algale
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Re: Bandsaw blade drift myths

Post by algale »

On further reflection, I'm not sure this stands up. When I put a new blade on and set up to rip, I always adjust the rip fence for the drift. I usually take a length of 1/2" plywood 2-3 wide, draw a line down the center and rip it by eye about half way. Clamp to the table and then set the fence to it. Plywood is not tension wood. So that type of drift is real.

Now, could tension wood cause additional issues, certainly.
Gale's Law: The bigger the woodworking project, the less the mistakes show in any photo taken far enough away to show the entire project!

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jsburger
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Re: Bandsaw blade drift myths

Post by jsburger »

algale wrote: Sun Nov 22, 2020 3:22 pm On further reflection, I'm not sure this stands up. When I put a new blade on and set up to rip, I always adjust the rip fence for the drift. I usually take a length of 1/2" plywood 2-3 wide, draw a line down the center and rip it by eye about half way. Clamp to the table and then set the fence to it. Plywood is not tension wood. So that type of drift is real.

Now, could tension wood cause additional issues, certainly.
I totally agree Al. That is the way I have done it for years and it works perfectly. Also, the way the video describes it the drift should be wood dependent when using a fence. When I set my fence as you describe the drift never changes. I can detension the blade and retension it and saw different pieces of stock and the fence does not need to be readjusted.
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