ShopSmith Manual advises use of Air Compressor

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ralph2
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ShopSmith Manual advises use of Air Compressor

Post by ralph2 »

I have just gotten my previously-owned ShopSmith back on its own two legs and am in the process of reading manuals and watching videos in preparation for doing my first project. So, I have gotten to the point where I am reading about cleaning, etc., and there is a recommendation that one blows sawdust, etc., out with an air compressor. Now I am sitting here htinking, "Okay, an air compressor . . . what the heck do I know about air compressors?"

Does anyone have any suggestions regarding what to look for in an air compressor?

I would love to not spend more than about $150 on an air compressor but I figure I need to get one that will handle the jog . . . I just don't have any specks about what will handle the job.
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dusty
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Post by dusty »

ralph2 wrote:I have just gotten my previously-owned ShopSmith back on its own two legs and am in the process of reading manuals and watching videos in preparation for doing my first project. So, I have gotten to the point where I am reading about cleaning, etc., and there is a recommendation that one blows sawdust, etc., out with an air compressor. Now I am sitting here htinking, "Okay, an air compressor . . . what the heck do I know about air compressors?"

Does anyone have any suggestions regarding what to look for in an air compressor?

I would love to not spend more than about $150 on an air compressor but I figure I need to get one that will handle the jog . . . I just don't have any specks about what will handle the job.
I believe that many of us use an air compressor to move the dust around but that is just what you do. I use a small vacuum (ShopVac) to pick up the majority of the shop debri and then I use an air compressor to move out that which the vacuum doesn't get.

I seldom drop the motor pan but whenever I do, I use the compressor to blow out the inside of the motor and all of the nucks and crannies within the headstock. When inclined to do this, I disconnect the motor completely and put the Shopsmith into the vertical mode. Cleaning and lubing the headstock is much easier.

The air compressor that I have is old and no longer available but it is an equivalent to this one:

http://www.acehardwaresuperstore.com/ca ... tml?ref=42
"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
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rkh2
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Post by rkh2 »

Ralph2

I have a Porter Cable Pancake Oil Free 6 Gal. 150 PSI air compressor which I bought from their web site which has reconditioned tools that carry a full 1 year warranty. It provides me with all the air I ever needed. I have had it for a couple of years now and never had a problem with it. Also it fits in the price range you are looking for. I am attaching a link to this particular site. Also, working at the Home Depot, sometimes they have specials on air compressors, usually around Christmas. Not sure if they have anything on special right now. Hope this info helps.

http://www.cpoworkshop.com/reconditione ... mpressors/
Ron from Lewisburg, TN
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dlbristol
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Post by dlbristol »

I don't have a compressor, so I use my shopvac. I bought a step down adapter for the 1 1/4 in hose and reduced it to 1/2 in. that steps up the velocity and seems to work pretty well. I also use it that way to vac out the motor. Be careful when you do this, I caused so problems. There is a clip in the headstock that holds the wires to the motor away from the speed changer and "porkchop". I was to aggressive in vacuming and pulled it off. The wires made contact with the sheave at high speeds and would blow the breakers!! Good help from the guys on SS forums saved me many headaches. These are great machines, but they are different from many of the more "standard" tools. read and ask!
Saw dust heals many wounds. RLTW
Dave
judaspre1982
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Post by judaspre1982 »

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Last edited by judaspre1982 on Sat May 20, 2017 9:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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fjimp
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Post by fjimp »

I purchased my first air compressor same 40 years ago. It served me well until last year when I sold it and purchased one that is quiet enough to use indoors. I have the new one permanantly mounted on a hand truck. This morning I needed to use my snow blower to clean over 9 inches of snow away. The air compressor was moved from my basement shop to the garage and filled snow blower tires in about 30 seconds. Then moved back to the basement.

Mine have been used to clean sawdust from within the shopsmith, final cleanup of projects prior to finishing, to run a wide variety of air driven tools. I can't begin to count the number of tires it has brought to life or the tears replaced with smiles on more kids than I can count when the favored wheeled toys were back in action. I have blown dust, soil and grease away from automotive parts. It has filled numerous air mattresses with air. I have bailed out passers by with enough air to make it to a tire store to have a flat repaired.

Come to think of it the air compressor may well have been the first tool my kids learned to use.

Worth the investment. Only if you have dust, dirt or equipment that may require air.
F. Jim Parks
Lakewood, Colorado:)

When the love of power is replaced by the power of love the world will have a chance for survival.
8iowa
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Post by 8iowa »

While in the U.P. last summer I purchased a 6 gal, 150 PSI "Tool Shop" compressor at Menards. It came with an 18 gauge brad nailer. the cost was less than $150 but it did not come with a hose or quick disconnect fittings, however, they were not too expensive.

At the time I was putting new flooring in our basement and needed the brad nailer to do the quarter round baseboard trim. I soon found that the brad nailer was also handy in the workshop on cabinet projects, and the compressor can also be put to good use blowing the dust out of the propane heater, and keeping my tires inflated to the proper level.
rolands
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Post by rolands »

Until you purchase an air compressor, you don't realize the number of times that it comes in handy. I have used it for everything that has been mentioned and more. I really like it with a nailer. Makes things so much easier and faster. The biggest problem is when everyone in the family wants to borrow it and it isn't there when you want it. :(
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dusty
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Post by dusty »

rolands wrote:Until you purchase an air compressor, you don't realize the number of times that it comes in handy. I have used it for everything that has been mentioned and more. I really like it with a nailer. Makes things so much easier and faster. The biggest problem is when everyone in the family wants to borrow it and it isn't there when you want it. :(
I solved that problem the hard way. I do not allow tools to leave my shop with anyone other than me. I DO NOT LOAN TOOLS to anyone. Anyone can come to my shop, if they want, and use them there.
"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
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beeg
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Post by beeg »

I've had TO MANY tools loaned out and either I've had to go get em or there's something I have to repair on em. NO MORE loans. When I borrowed the B-I-L's sawall, I didn't like the condition of the power cord, so I replaced it with new and longer for him.
SS 500(09/1980), DC3300, jointer, bandsaw, belt sander, Strip Sander, drum sanders,molder, dado, biscuit joiner, universal lathe tool rest, Oneway talon chuck, router bits & chucks and a De Walt 735 planer,a #5,#6, block planes. ALL in a 100 square foot shop.
.
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Bob
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