Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

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reible
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Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by reible »

Popular Woodworking youtube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7l8HsTe ... oodworking

I've only watched about 8 minutes of it at this point and I'm liking it. Got some other stuff to take care of and will watch the rest later today.

Ed
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by RFGuy »

Ed,

Thanks. This was an interesting video and much more in-depth showing the Shaper Origin in action than other videos I have seen. When they came out with the SO Workstation it looked like a great platform, to me, for doing unique and/or special joinery applications with the SO. However in this video it shows how easy it is to make a mistake with the SO, e.g. he showed a tail being ruined by not staying inside the lines. It seems like the SO isn't really the best tool for doing basic joinery like this, e.g. dovetails on a drawer/cabinet. I mean if you have a good quality dovetail jig, once the setup is correct, it is kinda foolproof compared to what I see for the SO in this video. Don't get me wrong, I see lots of value in the SO for doing inlays, sign work or really any other application where a handheld CNC is an advantage, but maybe joinery isn't the best application for the SO unless it is on contoured or irregular shapes pieces, etc. I have never used one so maybe I am missing something here, but just trying to understand in case I get the urge to buy one in the future.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by reible »

I personally don't like dovetail joint for things like this but that is just me. I have several jigs for this and have at one time developed the skill to hand cut them. But I lost interest in them maybe 30 years ago and have not done any since. While it is quite possible this type box needs a dovetail joint if it were really going to be going on an adventure but most likely it will just set somewhere safe.

Shaper has the ability to cut different ways such as pocketing, where it leaves a protected zone around the pocket and will not let you cut to the line. You do the pocket cut then switch to an inside cut and again it keeps you inside by retracting if you start to get outside the line. Normally you set up with an offset so that even if you do mess up on one of the inside cuts you still can come back and do your final pass at zero offset and since it will be a light cut there is less chance you will have an issue.

I used the inside analogy but you can also cut outside the line and retain the inside and again you can use an offset to get close then do the final cut to get right to what you want.

Not all operations are ones that you should use the shaper for. I use what ever tools make the most since, be it my shaper or my shopsmith or guide saw system. I like to do fun projects that while they could possibly be done other ways it is certainly more fun with the shaper. Remember it is only half a CNC. Doing a one of makes since, doing hundreds not so much. But if you have things like a pin router then making a pattern with the shaper then switching to the pin router makes a lot more sense.

I'm really glad I have mine and am looking forward to returning to some of my stack of projects that use it for. I have one which I had been doing on my home made workstation and will now be trying with the shaper one. Have to work out the clamping as it is quite different then how I had been doing it and that is critical for this project. I like the new station but I also like the version I made, I have stored it away but it may come back home for some projects. In fact it would be here if I had the room for it......

Ed
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

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RFGuy wrote: Mon Apr 12, 2021 6:25 pm Ed,

Thanks. This was an interesting video and much more in-depth showing the Shaper Origin in action than other videos I have seen. When they came out with the SO Workstation it looked like a great platform, to me, for doing unique and/or special joinery applications with the SO. However in this video it shows how easy it is to make a mistake with the SO, e.g. he showed a tail being ruined by not staying inside the lines. It seems like the SO isn't really the best tool for doing basic joinery like this, e.g. dovetails on a drawer/cabinet. I mean if you have a good quality dovetail jig, once the setup is correct, it is kinda foolproof compared to what I see for the SO in this video. Don't get me wrong, I see lots of value in the SO for doing inlays, sign work or really any other application where a handheld CNC is an advantage, but maybe joinery isn't the best application for the SO unless it is on contoured or irregular shapes pieces, etc. I have never used one so maybe I am missing something here, but just trying to understand in case I get the urge to buy one in the future.
Where did he show that. I guess I missed it. The circle on the screen is 1/2" in diameter. As long as the cut line is any where inside that circle Shaper will adjust and cut exactly where you tell it to. If you wander outside the circle Shaper will instantly retract. :confused:
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by BuckeyeDennis »

I’m following this with interest. I haven’t yet watched the video, but I can imagine that suddenly retracting a dovetail bit might not be a foolproof strategy.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by jsburger »

BuckeyeDennis wrote: Mon Apr 12, 2021 8:17 pm I’m following this with interest. I haven’t yet watched the video, but I can imagine that suddenly retracting a dovetail bit might not be a foolproof strategy.
Yes, that is a problem with dovetail and key hole bits. However, you would really have to be not paying attention to have that happen. The correction ability of the SO is 1/2". It is very easy to follow the cut line inside the 1/2" circle.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by RFGuy »

jsburger wrote: Mon Apr 12, 2021 7:34 pm Where did he show that. I guess I missed it. The circle on the screen is 1/2" in diameter. As long as the cut line is any where inside that circle Shaper will adjust and cut exactly where you tell it to. If you wander outside the circle Shaper will instantly retract. :confused:
John,

It is around about the 8:55 mark in the video. He said it happens when the SO senses an error, e.g. you go outside of your lines or you are pushing too hard it will retract the bit. Well retracting the bit is "okay" with a straight cutter but because he is using a dovetail bit when retracting it the error can become quite large as the bottom (large part of bit) comes up through the workpiece where you don't want to cut.

Ed,

Thanks for the great explanation. That makes sense. I guess the guy in that video was more trying to make a point that because the SW retracts the bit when it detects an error AND because the bit is a dovetail bit that when it retracts it can really mess up your workpiece. Maybe dovetails really aren't a good idea on an SO unless you are very experienced using it to begin with.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by sehast »

It seems like the SO isn't really the best tool for doing basic joinery like this, e.g. dovetails on a drawer/cabinet.
I feel like I have to chime in here even though Ed addressed it. The strongest application of the SO is making joints. That is 90% of what I use it for even though I have a traditional gantry CNC as well. Dovetails is not one of its strong points but if you are careful they can be done as this video indicates.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56tO946iOSI&t=26s

I am not a big fan of dovetails either but I have successfully done them with the SO after watching this video. Just like any tool the SO requires some talent and technique to get the best results.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by RFGuy »

sehast wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 10:05 am I feel like I have to chime in here even though Ed addressed it. The strongest application of the SO is making joints. That is 90% of what I use it for even though I have a traditional gantry CNC as well. Dovetails is not one of its strong points but if you are careful they can be done as this video indicates.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56tO946iOSI&t=26s

I am not a big fan of dovetails either but I have successfully done them with the SO after watching this video. Just like any tool the SO requires some talent and technique to get the best results.
Steve,

Thanks. Appreciate the feedback. So, I have to ask what your joinery preference is for making drawers? Both you and Ed share the opinion of moving away from dovetails. I have also heard differing opinions before on dovetails, so just curious on what your preferences are? Now that I have a Domino I was considering it for my next project that needs drawers, but open to suggestions.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by sehast »

Now that I have a Domino I was considering it for my next project.
You are going to like the Domino. I got one for Christmas and after a couple of projects I will never go back to biscuits or dowels. Primarily its for joints that are structural but don't show, at least that is the way I have used it so far. If you need to precisely and quickly join two pieces of wood for a glue up there is nothing better in my opinion.

I like the SO for show joints like box joints, bridal joints, mortise and thru tendons. Some of the more complex Japanese joints are also intriguing even though I have not had a project to use them yet. On some drawers and boxes I may also use dovetails, it just depends on where and how I want to draw attention to the piece. Might even jazz up some standard joints with inlays or uniquely shaped thru tendons, all is possible with the SO.
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