Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

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jsburger
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

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RFGuy wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 6:07 am
jsburger wrote: Mon Apr 12, 2021 7:34 pm Where did he show that. I guess I missed it. The circle on the screen is 1/2" in diameter. As long as the cut line is any where inside that circle Shaper will adjust and cut exactly where you tell it to. If you wander outside the circle Shaper will instantly retract. :confused:
John,

It is around about the 8:55 mark in the video. He said it happens when the SO senses an error, e.g. you go outside of your lines or you are pushing too hard it will retract the bit. Well retracting the bit is "okay" with a straight cutter but because he is using a dovetail bit when retracting it the error can become quite large as the bottom (large part of bit) comes up through the workpiece where you don't want to cut.

Ed,

Thanks for the great explanation. That makes sense. I guess the guy in that video was more trying to make a point that because the SW retracts the bit when it detects an error AND because the bit is a dovetail bit that when it retracts it can really mess up your workpiece. Maybe dovetails really aren't a good idea on an SO unless you are very experienced using it to begin with.
OK, I guess I glossed over that part. I think he was just demonstrating that one draw back of a dove tail bit. I wouldn't characterize it in general that it is easy to make a mistake with the SO. Like any tool you have to pay attention. The SO has a 1/2" margin of error where it will self correct. It is, at leas IMO, very easy to stay within that corrective range.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

Post by RFGuy »

jsburger wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 2:03 pm OK, I guess I glossed over that part. I think he was just demonstrating that one draw back of a dove tail bit. I wouldn't characterize it in general that it is easy to make a mistake with the SO. Like any tool you have to pay attention. The SO has a 1/2" margin of error where it will self correct. It is, at leas IMO, very easy to stay within that corrective range.
Thanks John. Yeah, I can see that now and understand at least what was shown in the video. Also thanks for your feedback on using the SO as well. Not owning an SO yet I was trying to understand its strengths and weaknesses and your comments help. I understand why they designed it to auto raise the bit on an error and normally that is a good practice for any CNC, I guess, but in this case with a dovetail bit it could cause quite a bit of removal as the bit lifts. It wasn't clear to me in the video whether this was a legitimate error that he made and showed on video, OR was it purposely done to illustrate the point of what could happen. He did say feed rate can cause it to do this, i.e. if you go too fast with the SO and that is more likely the kind of mistake that an inexperienced user like myself might make with an SO until I learn the tool well enough. Still this might be a freak occurrence.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

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RFGuy wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 2:08 pm
jsburger wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 2:03 pm OK, I guess I glossed over that part. I think he was just demonstrating that one draw back of a dove tail bit. I wouldn't characterize it in general that it is easy to make a mistake with the SO. Like any tool you have to pay attention. The SO has a 1/2" margin of error where it will self correct. It is, at leas IMO, very easy to stay within that corrective range.
Thanks John. Yeah, I can see that now and understand at least what was shown in the video. Also thanks for your feedback on using the SO as well. Not owning an SO yet I was trying to understand its strengths and weaknesses and your comments help. I understand why they designed it to auto raise the bit on an error and normally that is a good practice for any CNC, I guess, but in this case with a dovetail bit it could cause quite a bit of removal as the bit lifts. It wasn't clear to me in the video whether this was a legitimate error that he made and showed on video, OR was it purposely done to illustrate the point of what could happen. He did say feed rate can cause it to do this, i.e. if you go too fast with the SO and that is more likely the kind of mistake that an inexperienced user like myself might make with an SO until I learn the tool well enough. Still this might be a freak occurrence.
SO is just a router. If you have experience with any other router you know about feed rate. The SO is no different. Just let the cutter do the work as you would with a non-CNC router or for that matter a band saw or table saw or any other cutting tool and you won't have a problem.

I saw a WWGOA video just the other day where George had a ShopBot flat bed CNC router that now lets you hold stock vertically. He cut a bunch of different shaped through mortise and tenon joints. That is exactly what the SO works very well at. Sorry, I can't find the link. I am sure it was a YouTube video but I can't find it on the WWGOA YouTube page.
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

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John,

Thanks. Maybe this is the link below? I have seen several of his videos and like him (very down to Earth and communicates well). Yeah, I don't know if I will ever get a full CNC one day, but doing vertical work on the end, like joinery, definitely interests me. Since I am not doing production work though, I think the SO with the Workstation may be an easier platform to do specialty joinery on one-off furniture that I design. I am not worried about the SW though because I have extensive CAD experience and a little CAM experience so it shouldn't be too steep a learning curve for me hopefully. Also getting a good flat bed CNC with good vertical capability can get quite expensive, so the SO is likely a more affordable solution for someone like me.

https://www.wwgoa.com/video/shopbot-edg ... g-017923/#
📶RF Guy

Mark V 520 (Bought New '98) | 4" jointer | 6" beltsander | 12" planer | bandsaw | router table | speed reducer | univ. tool rest
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Re: Making a Dovetailed Adventure Chest with Shaper Origin

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RFGuy wrote: Tue Apr 13, 2021 3:47 pm John,

Thanks. Maybe this is the link below? Yeah, I don't know if I will ever get a full CNC one day, but doing vertical work on the end, like joinery, definitely interests me. Since I am not doing production work though, I think the SO with the Workstation may be an easier platform to do specialty joinery on one-off furniture that I design. I am not worried about the SW though because I have extensive CAD experience and a little CAM experience so it shouldn't be too steep a learning curve for me hopefully. Also getting a good flat bed CNC with good vertical capability can get quite expensive, so the SO is likely a more affordable solution for someone like me.

https://www.wwgoa.com/video/shopbot-edg ... g-017923/#
Yes, that is it. I thought it was YouTube but I also get the WWGOA emails. For me the software side is the largest learning curve. Since you have that mastered the SO will be a piece of cake for you. The other advantage of the SO, if it is needed, is that you can take the SO to the work and there is no size limit for the work. Inlays in large table tops comes to mind. You can cut both the negative and the positive from the same file. Cut the negative with an inside cut and cut the positive inset piece with the same file using an outside cut. You cut the positive inlay piece first. Then you cut the negative and do a test fit. If the inlay does not go in you re-cut the negative with a negative offset to make it slightly larger. A perfect fit every time. The SO is that accurate.

Speaking of George Vondriska, in his last live stream or maybe the one before he said he started with a Shopsmith and actually worked for Shopsmith as a demonstrator back in the day.
John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT
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