Hex wrench torque multiplier

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bobgroh
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Location: Just east of Kansas City, Missouri

Hex wrench torque multiplier

Post by bobgroh »

I was taking apart my 'new' jointer and struggling with the bolts securing the wedge bars. Just couldn't get enough 'grunt' with the hex wrenches I had available (i.e. garden variety 'L' style). I was also afraid of having the wrench slip out of the bolt and, as a consequence, having my knuckle's bashed up (or, worse, cut by the very sharp edges on the jointer blades). I needed more torque and more control.

I paused and reflected on the matter. In other circumstances (e.g. taking off a stubborn wheel nut), I would use a 'persuader' (i.e. a piece of pipe slipped over the wrench handle). Could I come up with something like that for my allen wrench but on a smaller scale?

I rummaged through the tool box and there was my salvation - a hex driver for a #6 nut (i.e. a screwdriver like nut driver). It has a hollow shaft and a nice comfortable handle. The allen wrench slipped inside the hollow shaft and I had my torque multiplier. Lots of control and more torque. Those bolts didn't have a chance! See attached photo.[ATTACH]3148[/ATTACH]
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Bob Groh
Blue Springs, Missouri (just east of Kansas City, MO)

--------------------------------------------
1984 SS Mark V updated to model 510
1994 SS Mark V updated to model 520
SS SPT's: Bandsaw
Other tools:routers, Bosch router table, Craftsman 6" jointer, Steel City 12" bench planer, Porter Cable 7" power saw, and too much other stuff (not really - just kidding!!)
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reible
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Post by reible »

Makes since to me. I'll keep that stored in my little gray cells if I can.

Thanks,

Ed
{Knight of the Shopsmith} [Hero's don't wear capes, they wear dog tags]
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dusty
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Hex Wrench Torgue Multiplier

Post by dusty »

This is a good tip especially for removing stubborn hex wrenches. Also, do not forget those hex sockets for your ratchet wrenches. They work too.

A word of caution around the Shopsmith; there are not many hex screws that need to be torgued down. Use of this multiplier should maybe be limited to "removing" stubborn screws and not installing them.
"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
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billmayo
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Joiner Wedge Screws

Post by billmayo »

[quote="dusty"]This is a good tip especially for removing stubborn hex wrenches. Also, do not forget those hex sockets for your ratchet wrenches. They work too.

A word of caution around the Shopsmith]

I use a S&K 5/32" hex drive socket with a 3/8" drive to remove the joiner wedge screws. When using an allen wrench, watch for the rounding of the edges as this can cause the rounding of the allen screw. This makes it very difficult to remove the screw when this occurs. When rounding is seen, I carefully grind about 1/4" off the allen wrench tip to get new sharp edges again. Be careful not to overhear the allen wrench tip when doing this task. I find the 3/32" allen wrench and set screw used for the Speed Control Handle has this problem quite often.

Allen head screws/bolts can easily be over-torqued. With the long side of the allen wrench in the screw/bolt, I use the short side of the allen wrench for my thumb to apply the torque/pressure as I find this prevents me from over-torquing the screw/bolt.
Bill Mayo bill.mayo@verizon.net
Shopsmith owner since 73. Sell, repair and rebuild Shopsmith, Total Shop & Wood Master headstocks, SPTs, attachments, accessories and parts. US Navy 1955-1975 (FTCS/E-8)
charlese
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Remembering Correctly?

Post by charlese »

Bob, That's a good solution! Did you put a bit of torque on the tool and then strike it with a metal hammer?

I ask this seriously - as I think I recall Nick telling us that striking a stuck set screw with punch, will loosen the seal between the threads that are holding it.

Hey guys, is this a true remembrance?
Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.
Chuck in Lancaster, CA
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reible
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Post by reible »

I don't recall Nick saying that but it makes since... as do impact drivers. I had a van door hinge that needed to be replaced, big problem was all the screws were torqued in and would not budge. Then I remembered a tool I had that I purchased to remove screws on the case of a motorcycle. A metal blue box with four bits and this chrome handle you stuck the bit in then put the bit on the screw and twisted as you hit it with a hammer... a couple of raps and out came the screws... I think they might have cost like $8.99 but were worth much more. Yep that will do it too.

Ed

charlese wrote:Bob, That's a good solution! Did you put a bit of torque on the tool and then strike it with a metal hammer?

I ask this seriously - as I think I recall Nick telling us that striking a stuck set screw with punch, will loosen the seal between the threads that are holding it.

Hey guys, is this a true remembrance?
{Knight of the Shopsmith} [Hero's don't wear capes, they wear dog tags]
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gilamonster
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Post by gilamonster »

reible wrote:A metal blue box with four bits and this chrome handle you stuck the bit in then put the bit on the screw and twisted as you hit it with a hammer... a couple of raps and out came the screws... Ed
Yep, it's called an impact wrench. Designed to do exactly what you described!
DOUG in PINE

My Dad's 1956 Greenie upgraded with Bandsaw, Jigsaw, Belt Sander, SpeedIncreaser, 1-1/8hp Emerson motor and 510 tables.
iclark
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Post by iclark »

charlese wrote:I ask this seriously - as I think I recall Nick telling us that striking a stuck set screw with punch, will loosen the seal between the threads that are holding it.
Chuck,

I cannot speak to Nick's doing this, but that is how my father taught my sister and me to change car tires. using an x-lug-wrench, put the proper socket on the lug, put one foot lightly on the lower cross bar, pull gently on the upper cross bar, and rap the end opposite the lug sharply with a hammer (preferably his favorite brassy;) ). it worked well. my father's explanation was that it vibrated the wheel rim and broke loose the shoulder taper on the lug bolt. I don't know if he learned the trick from his father (a farrier and mortician) or in the NACA machine shops. sadly, it never occurred to me to ask him while he was still around.

Ivan
Mark V (84) w/ jigsaw, belt sander, strip sander
ER10 awaiting restoration
buffalojim
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Re: Hex wrench torque multiplier

Post by buffalojim »

I know this is a very old post but thought I'd take a shot. What brand of hex driver is that? Thanks
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JPG
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Re: Hex wrench torque multiplier

Post by JPG »

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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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