Restoration Progress On My 1955 Greenie

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JPG
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Post by JPG »

mickyd wrote:Ahhhhhh....I do too....:eek: :eek:
DON'T WE ALL!!:D
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
charlese
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Post by charlese »

I just love to click on avatars. You see all kinds of photos!
Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.
Chuck in Lancaster, CA
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mickyd
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Reconditioning and cleaning saw and extension table

Post by mickyd »

Two months into this restoration project. Could have easily been done by now except for having too much other stuff going on. Getting real close though.

Brought the saw table and extension table back to life. They were very discolored with a gray/black surface contamination. I searched this forum looking for threads on how others may have dealt with removing this oxidation but didn't have any luck finding anything. I am sure someone must have discussed it at some point but it sure wasn't obvious in the search.

First I tried scotchbrite and Johnson's wax but that didn't even touch it. Then I tried using my 1/3 HP bench grinder with an 8" spiral sewn cotton wheel and the aggressive black polishing compound and that didn't touch it either. I then thought about trying some aluminum wheel cleaner that I think would have worked but decided against it when I looked at my bench grinder and thought of a brass wire wheel. I put on my 8" FINE grade brass wire brush and gave it a quick touch and saw that it took it all the way down to the base cast aluminum. Nice and bright. The wire brush was a FINE grade solid brass bristle brush. When you buy a brass brush, you need to make sure that it is solid brass and not brass coated steel. The first "brass" brush I bought a few months ago to restore some cast iron pans was actually brass plated steel. I didn't know that even existed when I bought it. Once the brass plate wears off, which is immediately upon contact with anything abrasive, your down to steel which is MUCH to abrasive for the soft aluminum so be careful here when buying. If your not sure if it's solid brass bristle, cut through a bristle and see if it's solid or plated. If plated, bring it back unless you have some aggressive work to do.

So, after about 45 minutes of work, I had both the extension and saw tables cleaned up. They look like brand new. Really pleased with the results.


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The Jacob's 3326 chuck cleaned up nicely with the brass brush also. Now all I have to do is find a key for it.


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Mike
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bucksaw
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Post by bucksaw »

check this post for the chuck key. I believe you can pick one up at Lowes, Home Depot or Ace.


http://www.shopsmith.net/forums/showthr ... =chuck+key

Where did you find the solid brass wire wheel? I've been looking.
Dave - Idaho
Greenie S#261612 - Mar 1954 / Greenie S#305336 - Oct 1955 / Gray S#SS1360 - ?

"Why do we drive on parkways and park on driveways?" :cool:
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horologist
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Post by horologist »

bucksaw wrote: Where did you find the solid brass wire wheel? I've been looking.
Dave,
Try here:
<http://www.julesborel.com/>

Do a search for brass wheel or scroll to p.61

For cleaning. the steel and brass wheels are good. The bristle wheels are good for polishing, load the bristles with rouge. These are handy tools.

Some safety notes.

1. Always wear eye protection. I also wear a dust mask, especially if I am using rouge. Leather gloves are also a good idea.
2. Don't stand inline with the wheel, especially when it is new. The wires come off with enough velocity that they can stick into your flesh like tiny arrows. Review rule 1 again.... I usually let a new wheel run for a while to work out the loose wires before use.
3. Be careful with large, or objects with a sharp edges. The wheel can grab your part and fling it quite a distance if it is wrapped around your hand or finger this can be painful.
4. Don't press hard, it only damages the wheel and leads to the wheel grabbing your part.


Troy
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

bucksaw wrote: Where did you find the solid brass wire wheel? I've been looking.

bucksaw - Got mine at Lowe's. They just started stocking these. They only have 8" diameter. They have course and fine grades. Their made by MIBRO. (China). If you have trouble locating one, let me know and I'll pick one up for you. Just let me know.
Mike
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

horologist wrote:Dave,
Try here:
http://www.julesborel.com/

Do a search for brass wheel or scroll to p.61

For cleaning. the steel and brass wheels are good. The bristle wheels are good for polishing, load the bristles with rouge. These are handy tools.

Some safety notes.

1. Always wear eye protection. I also wear a dust mask, especially if I am using rouge. Leather gloves are also a good idea.
2. Don't stand inline with the wheel, especially when it is new. The wires come off with enough velocity that they can stick into your flesh like tiny arrows. Review rule 1 again.... I usually let a new wheel run for a while to work out the loose wires before use.
3. Be careful with large, or objects with a sharp edges. The wheel can grab your part and fling it quite a distance if it is wrapped around your hand or finger this can be painful.
4. Don't press hard, it only damages the wheel and leads to the wheel grabbing your part.


Troy

Good points Troy. I'll add (and only subtract one):

1. Take your jewelery off (rings, watches, chains, bracelets etc.)
2. You WILL drop something when using the grinder. You'll bend over to pick it up while the machine is still running. REMEMBER when you lift your head up that there is a wheel spinning at 60+ MPH that is just dying to grab that little bit of hair you have left and pull your face in.
3. I don't wear gloves with a wire brush. I had one catch the cuff just a little one time and it scared me to death. I will use them if I have cotton polishing wheels on but not wire wheels.
4. Loose clothing / long sleeves can mess you up real fast too. Be conscience of where everything is. I don't wear loose shirts when using wire wheels.
5. I use a respirator when working with polishing compounds. Might be overkill but......
Mike
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horologist
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Post by horologist »

Mike,

You make some good points. As to the gloves, mostly I clean small parts and the gloves save a lot of wear and tear on the fingertips.

It has been some time since I looked, but the wheels they had at Lowes or Home Depot were far too aggressive and with an 8" diameter I can well understand why it scared you when it grabbed your cuff.

I will have to take a look at these wheels next time I'm in the big city.

Troy
The best equipped laundry room in the neighborhood...
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nebraska
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Post by nebraska »

How is the restoration coming, Mike?
It's been too long between your updates and I need a fix. :D
-Chad

1982 SS ~ Bandsaw, Jointer (Inherited in 2008, Restoration in Progress)
Primary Project ~ Making bamboo fly rods (View Complete Project Blog)
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heathicus
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Post by heathicus »

I think he got distracted by his 10ER acquisition! :D
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