1962 Goldie Disassembly

Forum for Maintenance and Repair topics. Feel free to ask questions or contribute.

Moderator: admin

Post Reply
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

ddvann79 wrote:Ahhhhh. I didn't think about where the pressure would be applied on the bearing. Thanks, Mike. But if I'm removing old bearings that I don't plan on reusing, does it matter how they are removed (with a puller)? Still, I would need a rig like yours for installing the new bearings. I wonder if I can rent one at an auto parts store.
Your correct in that if you are not going to re-use the bearings, you don't have to be concerned how you get them off.

I tried a gear puller to remove my bearings and ended out breaking one of the puller arms on the first attempt. My guess is you'll run into similar troubles with the pilot bushing puller. It's also VERY difficult to keep the jaws from spreading as you start to pull. I wrapped mine with several wraps of wire

For putting the new bearings on, if your REALLY conscience about alignment, you can cheat and use a hammer and some kind of device to contact in inner race. I did this on my ER10 and it worked fine. You can also use a deep socket instead of the wrench if you have one. Again here, it's CRITICAL you don't put the bearing on crooked or you can ruin the shaft.

Putting the shaft in the freezer for an hour or so AND heating up the bearing to 150° in an oven helps but may not be necessary. I didn't when I did my ER. With this method, it's not how hard you hit is how well you line things up. Little taps should show progress. If you see progress, your aligned OK.

If you can wait, others may have some suggestions.
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

Hey just realized you can't use the pilot bushing puller. You have nothing to push against. :eek:
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
wa2crk
Platinum Member
Posts: 3007
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2006 7:37 am
Location: Leesburg, Fl

Post by wa2crk »

Dalton;
With respect to your question regarding bearing replacement; If you have it apart as far as you have it then replace every bearing in the machine including the motor bearings. The bearings are very low cost and to do that level of work and put the machine back together with a suspicious bearing is a false economy.
You asked a question about the smeared plating on the idler shaft. I believe that is caused by the friction fit of the bearing on the shaft and the smear of metal on the shaft is displaced metal caused by the amount of pressure required to put those parts together.
Also about the bearings, on my headstock which I rebuilt in January of this year I used sealed bearings for all of the bearings. Sawdust that gets caked on the shielded bearings with the metal ball bearing cover can cause the lubricant to be leached out of the bearing and cause a premature failure,especially if you do a lot of sanding.
Bill V
User avatar
wa2crk
Platinum Member
Posts: 3007
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2006 7:37 am
Location: Leesburg, Fl

Post by wa2crk »

Dalton
I looked at your photos again and realized that the "smear " is actually on the shaft of the quill feed shaft. Same thought that it is displaced metal from the gear piece caused by the force fit of the shaft and the gear.
Bil V
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

[quote="wa2crk"]Dalton]
Regarding the bearings, another way to look at it is if you really think they are good, don't change them. These Mark V's can be taken apart so fast that it's really no big deal if down the road you decide you need to change them. For me, I felt that since I had it apart, I would change them out but really, no biggie if you do it later either. (I'm with you though Bill).
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
JPG
Platinum Member
Posts: 31883
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 7:42 pm
Location: Lexington, Ky (WILDCAT territory)

Post by JPG »

So many questions! Better they be asked than to wonder!

The quill 'splash' from the pinion gear is I believe 'normal' and is created when the aluminum gear is cast 'around' the shaft.

The quill feed 'bent' washer is supposed to be curved. Its purpose is to create a slight tension when the lock wingnut is snugged but not tight so that the quill will 'stay' put, but still able to be moved. This allows one handed adjustment of the quill position. Handy for depth of hole etc. adjustments. Once the desired position is obtained, the quill stop can be adjusted.

The pilot bearing remover is intended for removal of a bearing with the shaft removed. The threes 'fingers' grab the bearing from inside the inner race.

The speed control wear usually occurs on the quadrant gear teeth. The hardened strip usually does not wear significantly unless the control sheave bearing/clip is damaged.

The quill housing should be ok as long as any burrs are smoothed down with a file.

The quill is a single bearing. What you see is a spacer as has already been mentioned.

I am amazed that the motor has not overheated with all that debris!!!!!

Do make sure to blow out the motor(or better yet tear it down to clean it up and replace the bearings).

Methinks yer 3.2 MP camera has an excellent lense to get those closeups! Your lighting is excellent also! Tell us about the lighting!!!!!!!!!!

HF has a continuous 20% off single item coupon published what seems perpetually. Get one to save $12 on a bearing puller. The 20% does not apply to 'sale' prices.:(

Yer doing a fantastic job and you have done yer homework. Ya gonna love that machine after completion(?:D?). Bon Appetite!!!!!!
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
User avatar
ddvann79
Gold Member
Posts: 403
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:34 am
Location: Fort Worth, Texas

Motor and Photo Lighting

Post by ddvann79 »

Many thanks to everyone for sharing your experience and answering my questions. It's good to know I'm not just bugging everyone.

JPG, thanks for the concise answers!

I will probably have this machine broken down for a month or two so I have some time to decide on the bearings. My gut tells me that if I'm going to replace one, I might as well replace them all.

I'm planning on applying current to the motor soon for testing. I can spin the shaft fairly well but am a bit concerned about grit getting in the bearings and coils. Sometimes blowing out an electric motor can make problems worse since you end up with dust in places it shouldn't be.

I haven't had much luck finding diagrams for the 1 1/8 motor. I removed the four long carriage bolts in the motor housing and it still didn't come apart. I removed the black plastic cover on the back of the motor next to the capacitor and found two more screw-slotted carriage bolts inside with king nuts, under a couple of springs. I cautiously loosened them and the shaft seemed to spin more freely. I'm afraid of taking them all the way out for fear of disassembling it improperly. I've never worked on a motor this size, just power tool motors like drills. That's a different animal.

So how do I get this motor apart correctly? The fan sheave is still mounted on the shaft. Do I need to remove it first? Does that require a puller? There is a key/shear pin along the shaft so it looks like the sheave should slide right off but some gentle prying hasn't budged it.

Also, I want to test the motor and capacitor with a multimeter before I power it up and continuity test. It's 15amp, 115v, but what are the acceptable draw ranges upon start up and running? What are the specs for this capacitor? Sorry, I don't have access to pics right now (at work).

As for my photos, the key is lighting. Most of my photos are taken with a camera phone (3.2mpxl) but all you need is something between 3 and 5 megapixels. These 10 and 12 mpxl cameras out now are really only an improvement for drastic zooms and super close ups. My cameras have the feature where you depress the shutter button half way and it will auto focus and that's key for me. I did my first youtube videos with what I thought was ample lighting and they came out very dark. Now I also use a shop light and a flood light that are mounted on movable brackets so I can hang them where I want in the shop. Now the shop feels dark without them! A couple of clamp lights would do the trick. I also use a small LED flashlight for illuminating interior shots and close ups.

JPG, I have found that it depends upon which HF store you visit as to whether they will accept the 20% coupon on top of sale prices.

Here's a shot of the headstock casting after some mineral spirits, tooth brush and a soft paint remover wheel.

[ATTACH]10892[/ATTACH]
Attachments
Cleaned Up Headstock Casting.jpg
Cleaned Up Headstock Casting.jpg (131.12 KiB) Viewed 3617 times
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
User avatar
beeg
Platinum Member
Posts: 4689
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2007 2:33 pm
Location: St. Louis, Mo.

Post by beeg »

ddvann79 wrote:I haven't had much luck finding diagrams for the 1 1/8 motor.

The fan sheave is still mounted on the shaft. Do I need to remove it first?
[ATTACH]10892[/ATTACH]

You won't find much info, because it's a proprietary motor.

Remove the sheave by loosening the set screw, it should just slide off then. Well except it might be gunked up. Oh and NEVER let go of the the outside sheave, when ya have it pulled away from the other one.
SS 500(09/1980), DC3300, jointer, bandsaw, belt sander, Strip Sander, drum sanders,molder, dado, biscuit joiner, universal lathe tool rest, Oneway talon chuck, router bits & chucks and a De Walt 735 planer,a #5,#6, block planes. ALL in a 100 square foot shop.
.
.

Bob
User avatar
ddvann79
Gold Member
Posts: 403
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:34 am
Location: Fort Worth, Texas

Motor Info

Post by ddvann79 »

Here's some pics for my 1 1/8 hp A.O. Smith Motor. I still haven't figured out how to get the dad burn thing apart. I'm thinking I'm tackling it from the wrong end.

[ATTACH]10899[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH]10900[/ATTACH]

This photo is after I blew it out and removed the back cover.
[ATTACH]10901[/ATTACH]
Attachments
IMG01199-20101114-1929.jpg
IMG01199-20101114-1929.jpg (154.95 KiB) Viewed 3586 times
IMG01190-20101114-1914.jpg
IMG01190-20101114-1914.jpg (148.93 KiB) Viewed 3590 times
IMG01218-20101116-2145.jpg
IMG01218-20101116-2145.jpg (123.79 KiB) Viewed 3588 times
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
hew
Gold Member
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:45 am
Location: Southeast MO

Post by hew »

On the long shaft end look up from the bottom through the fan opening. There be set screw that you see as you turn the shaft. After you loosen the set screw and remove the 4 long screws on the capacitor that end that is holding both ends of the motor. Sorry you already have the long screws out. With the set screw loose pull the shaft end cap of the motor (fan housing)off.
hew
Shopsmith - Mark V 500, Mark V 510/520, Bandsaw, Jointer, Belt Sander, Scroll Saw, Strip Sander, Planer on powerstand, Router Arm w/under table router, Dust Collector, Ryobi BT 3000 TS, Porter Cable 12" Mitersaw, Routers - Hitachi M12V, M12VC Base & Plunge, Ryobi RE600, Porter Cable 690 Base & Plunge
Post Reply