1962 Goldie Disassembly

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ddvann79
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Rust Rovmoval Test #1 - Paiting It On

Post by ddvann79 »

The cost of this project is a consideration so I'm trying to strike a balance with a little benefit-cost analysis, for you economists out there. I ran across a bottle of "The Must for Rust" by Krud Kutter at Wally World and thought I would give it a shot. I think I paid $4 for an 8 oz. bottle. Not the most economical, but fine for testing.

I started with the combination saw blade I got from my dad. It's in rough shape. Lots of rust, pitting and rust buildup. I didn't want to pour the stuff into a container large enough to submerge the blade because that would use up the whole bottle. So I squirted the stuff on the blade and used a chip brush to spread it around in what I thought was a fairly thick coat.

Here's the blade before treatment. The darker areas are caused by penetrating oil from removing the saw arbor.
[ATTACH]10989[/ATTACH]

"Painting on" the Krud Kutter. Notice that surface tension tended to retract the rust remover from areas that weren't coated with penetrating oil (bottom right).
[ATTACH]10990[/ATTACH]

After 10 hours and a Brillo pad.
[ATTACH]10991[/ATTACH]

As you can see, painting on rust remover isn't the most effective technique. At least not for this brand. Still, it has some effect. I'm sure a few more coats with the same process wouldn't hurt.

It's worth noting that the darker teeth at the top of the photo correspond with the teeth that DID NOT get soaked with penetrating oil to remove the saw arbor that the blade was stuck to. Moral of the story: penetrating oil will aid in rust removal.

Here's what the blade looks like after 15 minutes with a stout abrasive wheel on a drill motor. The darker area at the top is simply a function of sheen.

[ATTACH]10992[/ATTACH]

Moral of the story: need more cow bell... err... soaking with rust remover. See Test #2 for "the rrrrest of the story."
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Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:The cost of this project is a consideration so I'm trying to strike a balance with a little benefit-cost analysis, for you economists out there. I ran across a bottle of "The Must for Rust" by Krud Kutter at Wally World and thought I would give it a shot. I think I paid $4 for an 8 oz. bottle. Not the most economical, but fine for testing.

I started with the combination saw blade I got from my dad. It's in rough shape. Lots of rust, pitting and rust buildup. I didn't want to pour the stuff into a container large enough to submerge the blade because that would use up the whole bottle. So I squirted the stuff on the blade and used a chip brush to spread it around in what I thought was a fairly thick coat.

Here's the blade before treatment. The darker areas are caused by penetrating oil from removing the saw arbor.
[ATTACH]10989[/ATTACH]

"Painting on" the Krud Kutter. Notice that surface tension tended to retract the rust remover from areas that weren't coated with penetrating oil (bottom right).
[ATTACH]10990[/ATTACH]

After 10 hours and a Brillo pad.
[ATTACH]10991[/ATTACH]

As you can see, painting on rust remover isn't the most effective technique. At least not for this brand. Still, it has some effect. I'm sure a few more coats with the same process wouldn't hurt.

It's worth noting that the darker teeth at the top of the photo correspond with the teeth that DID NOT get soaked with penetrating oil to remove the saw arbor that the blade was stuck to. Moral of the story: penetrating oil will aid in rust removal.

Here's what the blade looks like after 15 minutes with a stout abrasive wheel on a drill motor. The darker area at the top is simply a function of sheen.

[ATTACH]10992[/ATTACH]

Moral of the story: need more cow bell... err... soaking with rust remover. See Test #2 for "the rrrrest of the story."
FWIW electrolysis would be a good method for this endeavor. Washing soda is also che ah inexpensive. Evaporust would also work(naval jelly-maybe). They cost more!
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╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

You already know my method of choice. Hint: cathode / anode....

Evaporust 2nd

Wire wheel on a bench grinder 3rd
Mike
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ddvann79
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Rust Removal Test #2 - Soaking

Post by ddvann79 »

In myprevious post, I describe my results from one coat of "painting on" rust remover. Not the most effective technique.

In this test, I submerged what I'm calling a lathe arbor to see how this works. I used the same "The Must for Rust" made by Krud Kutter that I got from Wal-Mart. This time, I used a solution of one part Krud Kutter to one part water. The label describes diluting with water, which is similar to directions on EvapoRust. Incidentally, this stuff is also supposed to be biodegradable (whatever that standard is) and is supposed to inhibit new rust for months.

Here's what the lathe arbor looked like, pretreatment. Mmm Mmm...
[ATTACH]10993[/ATTACH]

Adding the Krud Kutter to the water at a ratio of +/- 1:1.
[ATTACH]10994[/ATTACH]

Right after pulling the lathe bit out of solution from its 24-hour soak. Man, that stuff smells like rotten eggs!
[ATTACH]10995[/ATTACH]

After hitting it with a steel wire wheel.
[ATTACH]10996[/ATTACH]

After a bit of filing and some white polishing compound (yup, I went to Harbor Freight today).
[ATTACH]10997[/ATTACH]

Despite the marring from Vise Grips or water pump pliers, it turned out pretty well. Moral of the story, soaking in "The Must for Rust" over night in a 1:1 water solution works pretty well and makes the stuff go farther. Plus, it removes rust deposits internally that abrasive wheels wouldn't be able to get at. The next step is to try Evapo-Rust and see how it performs.

I should note that I'm not sure how The Must for Rust works. I know Evapo-Rust only affects iron, so iron oxide (rust) is removed while leaving the stronger steel alloy. I'm not promoting Krud Kutter! I'm just testing it to see how well it works, but it looks like if you can submerge it, it works well at a 50% dilution. However, it did not remove paint or resin.
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Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

JPG40504 wrote:FWIW electrolysis would be a good method for this endeavor. Washing soda is also che ah inexpensive. Evaporust would also work(naval jelly-maybe). They cost more!
You read my mind. That will be partially dependent upon what I get for Christmas! I.E. battery charger.
Dalton
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1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:You read my mind. That will be partially dependent upon what I get for Christmas! I.E. battery charger.

Make sure Santa does not bring you a 'smart' charger! :eek:
If he does, you will need to 'outsmart' it!:D
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
pennview
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Post by pennview »

You can buy Evapo-Rust at Harbor Freight. It's about $16.00 a gallon there with one of those 20 percent off coupons. Tomorrow it will be $15.00 if you use the 25 percent off coupon that you can get at http://www.harborfreight.com/thanksgivi ... oupon.html
Art in Western Pennsylvania
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

pennview wrote:You can buy Evapo-Rust at Harbor Freight. It's about $16.00 a gallon there with one of those 20 percent off coupons. Tomorrow it will be $15.00 if you use the 25 percent off coupon that you can get at http://www.harborfreight.com/thanksgiving-day-coupon.html

And I cannot emphasize too much that IMHO(sorry Mike) the evaporust/drain pipe(2" + 1") is the gooder way. It is quick(overnite) and gets both inside and outside. Much quicker than rotten potatoes and consumes nothing off the power grid. Also leaves a temporary rust preventative if not wiped off.:D

Shorter pieces of smaller id drain pipe and evaporust works on shorter skinnier parts as well!(mounting tubes . . . );)
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

JPG40504 wrote:Make sure Santa does not bring you a 'smart' charger! :eek:
If he does, you will need to 'outsmart' it!:D
'Stupid' charger is the way to go. An nice OLD functioning 6 - 12 V Craigslist model that shows amps is my choice. Start shopping Craigslist now and get yourself an early Christmas present of $10.
Mike
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Post by mickyd »

[quote="JPG40504"]And I cannot emphasize too much that IMHO(sorry Mike) the evaporust/drain pipe(2" + 1") is the gooder way. It is quick(overnite) and gets both inside and outside. Much quicker than rotten potatoes and consumes nothing off the power grid. Also leaves a temporary rust preventative if not wiped off.:D

Shorter pieces of smaller id drain pipe and evaporust works on shorter skinnier parts as well!(mounting tubes . . . )]
No offense. Evaporust works excellent (and even better) for reasons mentioned. Half my pleasure comes from just watching the electrolysis process in action. :D
Mike
Sunny San Diego
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