1962 Goldie Disassembly

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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

JPG40504 wrote:Notice the washer is nearly as thin as the retaining ring

I noticed something else! Need to 'fix' that!
Fix what?!
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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wa2crk
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Post by wa2crk »

Is there a crack in the spring housing or is it one of my "optical delusions"?
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:Fix what?!
I needed to fix the original post where you got that pix. The index mark is not positioned properly(in my pix).
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

JPG40504 wrote:I needed to fix the original post where you got that pix. The index mark is not positioned properly(in my pix).
Well, that depends upon where it was originally, right? Or is it supposed to always be straight up? If I recall, Nick talked about marking it's location on the headstock and putting it back where it was. Incidentally, mine's not.

Bill V,

I did a double take after posting that photo. It does look like a crack but it's actually a stain where the barrel sat in some REALLY old Evaporust that didn't cover the whole assembly. It's a "high water mark" as it were and I didn't feel compelled to sand it off.
Dalton
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1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:Well, that depends upon where it was originally, right? Or is it supposed to always be straight up? If I recall, Nick talked about marking it's location on the headstock and putting it back where it was. Incidentally, mine's not.

Bill V,

I did a double take after posting that photo. It does look like a crack but it's actually a stain where the barrel sat in some REALLY old Evaporust that didn't cover the whole assembly. It's a "high water mark" as it were and I didn't feel compelled to sand it off.

Surprise!!! I checked my Goldie. Guess what! No skinny flat washer!!!!!!P.S. My original manual shows one!!!!!!!!!!!!!

???? I do not know why Nick said to mark??? To me it is a matter of visibility in both the hor and vert positions.
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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The Goldie Runs!!!!!

Post by ddvann79 »

She came back to life tonight but there is still a problem. I turned it on and she ran beautifully. Everything sounded pretty smooth. I turned the speeddial up and it was smooth and easy to turn. I got up to high speed and WHACK! The control sheave hit the back of the pork chop. I powered it down quickly and I don't think there is any real damage. The dial is stiff now. I think that's because the worm screw is now pushed to one side of the rack - probably the side that's worn.

I figure the quadrant fingers are now bent and I'll have to pull it out and see what I can do. In this photo, you can see where it hit the control sheave. Also, you can see how off centered the pork chop is.

[ATTACH]11625[/ATTACH]

Here's avideoof the SECOND time I powered it up. Please let me know what you think is going on here. I have not yet made the high speed adjustment.

When I installed the dial, it would stop at "slow" but wouldn't go all the way around to "fast" when turning the shaft by hand. I think I installed the dial incorrectly and that allowed the quadrant to travel too far but I'm not sure yet. I was a bit concerned about where that groove in the back of the dial was placed when I assembled it but I haven't really found any instructions that clearly explains where it should be placed in relation to the speed indication mark. In other words, the groove in the back of the dial doesn't travel all the way around and I wasn't sure which side of the groove the retention spring was supposed to go. You can see in the last photo below the speeddial is clearly not in the right place for being at the low end of the speed range.

Here's some shots of the headstock mostly put together.

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IMG02252-20110127-2109.jpg
IMG02252-20110127-2109.jpg (120.55 KiB) Viewed 3473 times
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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dusty
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Post by dusty »

Your Goldie looks great, Dalton. It doesn't sound bad either.

You need to do a "High Speed Adjust". The stop is set at the wrong location and it allows the speed control to cause the sheave to travel too far.

As for being harder to turn at some locations, you might need to clean, lubricate or even file smooth some of the teeth in the pork chop. The worm gear is hardened steel. The pork chop is not. Therefore when their is a collision, the pork chop losses.

BTW - I love this video insert approach (YouTube) for communication this sort of information. You've got the process nailed.

I'm almost there. I need to develop the ability to improve the audio. I have Audacity on my computer but have no yet learned how to use it.
"Making Sawdust Safely"
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

You need to do a high speed adjustment.(limits high speed position of control sheave)

You can do a rough setting by adjusting the jam nut/stop screw so the top of the screw is flush with the top of the jam nut.

The dial position is the last thing done during the high speed adjustment.

Your dial is mispositioned since the slow limit(the closest the control sheave can be 'pushed') indicates 'down' past the slow position on the dial.

I assume you have seen this, but in case not, begin about 09:30.
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

Thanks, Dusty and JPG.

I'm very pleased at how it sounds. I took the time to file down rough edges, dents and irregularities as well as smoothing out the casting and carefully lubricating. I was concerned about how well the motor would run since there were a few burn marks on the stator, and it still has yet to be put under a load. There are several things I would like to have done differently, given more experience and additional time. All things considered, I'm quite pleased with the headstock thus far, especially since the most experience I have with machinery is changing a timing belt or "bailing wire" fixes on farm equipment.

JPG,

No, I hadn't watched Sawdust Session #17. I mostly hung out around 21 - 24. I did, however have access to these instructions on replacing the speed changer, and this one on the high-speed adjustment.

So here's what I think I need to do, if I understand correctly:

1. Assess and remedy any damage to the quadrant
2. Adjust the height of the set screw relative to the jam nut
3. Align the speedial correctly.

Will that rough adjustment of the set screw keep the control sheave from contacting the quadrant assembly during this process?

[ATTACH]11634[/ATTACH]
Attachments
Speed Changer Diagram.JPG
Speed Changer Diagram.JPG (101.56 KiB) Viewed 3467 times
Dalton
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1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:Thanks, Dusty and JPG.

I'm very pleased at how it sounds. I took the time to file down rough edges, dents and irregularities as well as smoothing out the casting and carefully lubricating. I was concerned about how well the motor would run since there were a few burn marks on the stator, and it still has yet to be put under a load. There are several things I would like to have done differently, given more experience and additional time. All things considered, I'm quite pleased with the headstock thus far, especially since the most experience I have with machinery is changing a timing belt or "bailing wire" fixes on farm equipment.

JPG,

No, I hadn't watched Sawdust Session #17. I mostly hung out around 21 - 24. I did, however have access to these instructions on [url=http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:void%28window.open%28%27/svcadv/replacingthespeedchanger.PDF%27,%20%27%27,%20%27width=640,height=480,resizeable,scrollbars%27%29%29]replacing the speed changer[/url], and this one on the [url=http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:void%28window.open%28%27/svcadv/howtodoahighspeedadjustment.PDF%27,%20%27%27,%20%27width=640,height=480,resizeable,scrollbars%27%29%29]high-speed adjustment.[/url]

So here's what I think I need to do, if I understand correctly:

1. Assess and remedy any damage to the quadrant
2. Adjust the height of the set screw relative to the jam nut
3. Align the speedial correctly.

Will that rough adjustment of the set screw keep the control sheave from contacting the quadrant assembly during this process?

[ATTACH]11634[/ATTACH]

No Guarantees from me, however that is the 'factory setting' when new. You should be able to run it up under manual power to determine amount of 'clearance'. Wear is a factor regarding 'guarantee'! When correct(also depends on belt length/width/wear) it should stop close to or just past slow going down in speed.

BTW that groove on the rear you mentioned earlier. The anti rattle spring should provide 'extra' drag as it is adjusted above saw-joint. That is where the groove 'ends'.

P.S. Yer links above are 'broken'!
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╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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