Restoration Progress On My 1955 Greenie

Forum for Maintenance and Repair topics. Feel free to ask questions or contribute.

Moderator: admin

User avatar
dusty
Platinum Member
Posts: 20230
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2006 6:52 am
Location: Tucson (Wildcat Country), Arizona

Post by dusty »

It is most unfortunate that you didn't get the help you were seeking. However, I am sure many are just like me. I have no experience in this matter and had nothing valid to offer.

If I had replied based on gut feeling, I would have said to prime.
"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

I am doing work on the Gilmer clutch drive but wanted to include it on a separate thread since it's a topic of it's own and didn't want it to get lost in this thread. You can see it at:

http://www.shopsmith.net/forums/showthr ... #post32871
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
nebraska
Gold Member
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 3:15 pm
Location: Omaha, NE
Contact:

Post by nebraska »

Great thread!
I wish I would have tracked my restoration progress like you're doing. Keep the reports coming.
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

Never too late to buy another one nebraska!!

Hey, you should update your profile so we know more about you. Make sure to include social and credit card numbers. :D
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

Quick update on my restoration work. Seems like everything is taking forever. When you get down into the detail, things go much slower.

Finished with painting the headstock parts. I put a second coat on everything because of the pinhole condition I noticed. Glad I did because I also got a better texture match this time. For the first coat, I painted the headstock casting, sheet metal motor cover, and belt cover at three separate times and whereas they look good to themselves, I got three unique textures that were visually different when everything was together. To get away from this, I did them at the same time. I assembled the headstock casting and motor pan with temporary screws and them painted them together. Now, all three components match.

[ATTACH]3561[/ATTACH] [ATTACH]3562[/ATTACH]




Also completed the bench and way tubes. Bench tubes went through the electrolysis baththen both bench and way tubes were sanded on the drill setupdiscussed in another thread. Polished them up with Johnson's Original Paste wax and they look good as new.

[ATTACH]3564[/ATTACH][ATTACH]3563[/ATTACH]




Got all the cast aluminum stripped and ready for a light sanding and then priming. Shooting for two coats of paint this weekend. (Notice the single polished caster mounting bracket).


[ATTACH]3565[/ATTACH]


That's it for now. Work tomorrow. Time to hit it.
Attachments
Img_5141mod2.jpg
Img_5141mod2.jpg (75.19 KiB) Viewed 6697 times
Img_5141mod3.jpg
Img_5141mod3.jpg (73.52 KiB) Viewed 6677 times
Img_5150mod.jpg
Img_5150mod.jpg (39.45 KiB) Viewed 6593 times
Img_4916-1.jpg
Img_4916-1.jpg (48.39 KiB) Viewed 6605 times
Img_5134mod.jpg
Img_5134mod.jpg (43.35 KiB) Viewed 6604 times
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

mickyd wrote:Got all the cast aluminum stripped and ready for a light sanding and then priming. Shooting for two coats of paint this weekend. (Notice the single polished caster mounting bracket).
Forgot to mention that I used "CitriStrip" from Lowe's to remove all the paint from both steel and cast aluminum. In general it worked GREAT but there were a just a couple of tough spots that from some reason, it wouldn't soften so I had to use regular nasty paint stripper.
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
thainglo
Gold Member
Posts: 81
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 10:28 pm
Location: Silver Creek, GA

Post by thainglo »

mickyd wrote:Also complete the bench and way tubes. Bench tubes went through the electrolysis bath then both bench and way tubes were sanded on the drill setup discussed previously in the thread. Polished them up with Johnson's Original Paste wax and they look good as new.
Micky - I'm curious about the drill setup you used, but searched the post and couldn't find details. Got a set of tubes that aren't rusted to the point of needing electrolysis, but would certainly benefit from a good polishing.

Thanks!
Matt
Lost count, over a dozen rebuilt/repaired/restored
Personal equipment: 510 made in 1993, belt sander, jig saw, band saw, planer and jointer

Matt in GA
User avatar
dusty
Platinum Member
Posts: 20230
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2006 6:52 am
Location: Tucson (Wildcat Country), Arizona

Post by dusty »

Some of the threads that have been posted here lately are absolutely fantastic. They have been extremely informative. Some, like this one, constitute an extension of what Nick was providing. I believe Nick would be proud of what he has started.

I can't wait to see the finished products.

You guys have got me thinking I need to cleanup the tubes on my Mark V. I don't have any rust but they definitely show signs of wear and tear. Maybe it is time to set up a polishing station.;)
"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.
User avatar
mickyd
Platinum Member
Posts: 2989
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by mickyd »

thainglo wrote:Micky - I'm curious about the drill setup you used, but searched the post and couldn't find details. Got a set of tubes that aren't rusted to the point of needing electrolysis, but would certainly benefit from a good polishing.

Thanks!
Matt
Matt,

The drill setup I used was buried in a thread "Crocus Cloth Substitute". Here's the link to the info. It's post #14.

http://www.shopsmith.net/forums/showthr ... BENCH+TUBE

Note: Expansion plug sizes below were updated 3/26/09 to correct errors.
It's a pretty straight forward process. You'll need a 1-1/2" to 1-3/4" expansion plug to do your bench tubes and a 1-1/4" to 1-3/8" to do your way tubes. In my setup, the far end of the tubes weren't chucked but next time, I think I would use an expansion tube on that side also. The far end just spun resting again a stop and they actually got pretty hot on that side. Even resting that side on a towel to reduce friction wasn't enough to keep them cool.

Let me know if you need any more details.

p.s. If you take your time and make sure the expansion plugs go in nice and straight and you keep the drill RPM reasonable, they'll run true enough where it's not a safety hazard. I had my wife supervise when I did the way tubes because I couldn't get it to run as true as the bench tube. She watched the setup to make sure it wasn't moving. I think it didn't run as true as the bench tubes because of the amount the expansion the plug had expand to fit tightly. It just didn't expand accurately. The 1-1/2"' plug for the bench tubes fit much closer right out out of the shoot.
Mike
Sunny San Diego
User avatar
thainglo
Gold Member
Posts: 81
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 10:28 pm
Location: Silver Creek, GA

Post by thainglo »

Great info Mike! Saw your other post first with the picture showing a very simple, useful setup. I'll try that out this weekend, assuming I can find some expansion plugs. Did you pick those up at the local hardware store?

Matt
Lost count, over a dozen rebuilt/repaired/restored
Personal equipment: 510 made in 1993, belt sander, jig saw, band saw, planer and jointer

Matt in GA
Post Reply