Restoration Progress On My 1955 Greenie

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SDSSmith
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Post by SDSSmith »

mickyd wrote:Good questions! You really think a lot. :D I'll check when I get home. My recall is that the way tubes had a greater wall thickness than the bench tube in turn, making them more ridged (heavier) if the OD's are the same.

Don't know if they are original Greenie tubes or not. Maybe some other Greenie's out there can check their tubes for OD, ID. I know I didn't replace them and am not sure about previous genealogy of ownership.
The early Mark V's had bench tubes that were 1-7/8" OD.
Rob in San Diego
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

SDSSmith wrote:The early Mark V's had bench tubes that were 1-7/8" OD.
Rob,
Do you know what the tube inside diameter measured? Were the bench and way tubes different?
Mike
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

SDSSmith wrote:The early Mark V's had bench tubes that were 1-7/8" OD.
ALL SS waytubes are 1 3/4" OD. The variations are the wall thickness. 10e/r were about 2x as thick as the 'present" ones. They (way tubes) are ALL 52" long. Bench (lower) tubes are 3/4" longer.
I was surprised mike's greenie had the thicker way tubes and wondered(still) if that was 'normal' for all greenies. i.e. Did models other than the 10e/r have heavier tubes. I did not think so since the 'later' models HAVE a second set of tubes(bench) whereas the 10e/r only had the one set of tubes(way)..

When you say 'early' mark V's, WHAT years are relevant. Mark "V" did not come into being until 1972(SS INC.). Previous units were Mark 5's.
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

JPG40504 wrote:ALL SS waytubes are 1 3/4" OD. The variations are the wall thickness. 10e/r were about 2x as thick as the 'present" ones. They (way tubes) are ALL 52" long. Bench (lower) tubes are 3/4" longer.
I was surprised mike's greenie had the thicker way tubes and wondered(still) if that was 'normal' for all greenies. i.e. Did models other than the 10e/r have heavier tubes. I did not think so since the 'later' models HAVE a second set of tubes(bench) whereas the 10e/r only had the one set of tubes(way)..

When you say 'early' mark V's, WHAT years are relevant. Mark "V" did not come into being until 1972(SS INC.). Previous units were Mark 5's.
I checked my way tubes and my initial response in post #60 was incorrect. I udpated the post accordingly. Both bench and way tubes have the same wall thickness. The difference I had actually observed was in the OD. Way tubes are 1-3/4", bench tubes are 1-7/8". They have identical wall thickness of 1/8". Sorry if I cause confusion.:o
Mike
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

mickyd wrote:I checked my way tubes and my initial response in post #60 was incorrect. I udpated the post accordingly. Both bench and way tubes have the same wall thickness. The difference I had actually observed was in the OD. Way tubes are 1-3/4", bench tubes are 1-7/8". They have identical wall thickness of 1/8". Sorry if I cause confusion.:o
You did NOT cause CONFUSION, you PROVIDED information. As I understand it NOW Greenies have 1 7/8" bench tubes. That is why you needed two different size 'freeze plugs'. Now to determine if early goldies are the same.
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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Post by mickyd »

mickyd wrote:I checked my way tubes and my initial response in post #60 was incorrect. I udpated the post accordingly. Both bench and way tubes have the same wall thickness. The difference I had actually observed was in the OD. Way tubes are 1-3/4", bench tubes are 1-7/8". They have identical wall thickness of 1/8". Sorry if I cause confusion.:o
I also corrected the error I made on specifying the expansion plug sizes needed for the bench and way tubes in post #29.of this thread.
Mike
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SDSSmith
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Post by SDSSmith »

mickyd wrote:Rob,
Do you know what the tube inside diameter measured? Were the bench and way tubes different?
Mike, I do not have any of those tubes around right now so I cannot measure for you. As noted, all Mark v's have 1-3/4" OD way tubes.
Rob in San Diego
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robinson46176
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Post by robinson46176 »

JPG40504 wrote:Now to determine if early goldies are the same.
And were all goldies shipped with the "glazed" bench tubes instead of polished?
*
Some bench tubes I have painted and some I have polished... I have mixed emotions. The polished ones look good but have to be waxed often especially in a shop that makes stuff sweat in mild weather. So far the painted tubes are holding up nicely and still look good. In a shop where they might get scratched a lot (I'm not sure why) the polished ones might look good longer. While the polished bench tubes do have to be waxed often the way tubes need to be waxed often anyway and it is easy to wax the bench tubes at the same time so it all comes out about the same.
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I did not equip with Shopsmiths in spite of the setups but because of them.
1 1988 - Mark V 510 (bought new), 4 Poly vee 1 1/8th HP Mark V's, Mark VII, 1 Mark V Mini, 1 Frankensmith, 1 10-ER, 1 Mark V Push-me-Pull-me Drillpress, SS bandsaw, belt sander, jointer, jigsaw, shaper attach, mortising attach, TS-3650 Rigid tablesaw, RAS, 6" long bed jointer, Foley/Belsaw Planer/molder/ripsaw, 1" sander, oscillating spindle/belt sander, Scroll saw, Woodmizer sawmill
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Post by JPG »

robinson46176 wrote:And were all goldies shipped with the "glazed" bench tubes instead of polished?
*
Some bench tubes I have painted and some I have polished... I have mixed emotions. The polished ones look good but have to be waxed often especially in a shop that makes stuff sweat in mild weather. So far the painted tubes are holding up nicely and still look good. In a shop where they might get scratched a lot (I'm not sure why) the polished ones might look good longer. While the polished bench tubes do have to be waxed often the way tubes need to be waxed often anyway and it is easy to wax the bench tubes at the same time so it all comes out about the same.
I am guessing, but I think the early goldies differ from the greenies only in color. The later goldies(1 1/8HP,poly=v,extruded rip fence lip) have 1 3/4" Gray painted Bench tubes. Just because this makes sense, does NOT make it so! Hence the guessing part.
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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Post by mickyd »

mickyd wrote:Make sure to post pics bucksaw.

I am going to try a flap sanding wheel (80grit) on a dremel tool for the next piece. They sell for about $8. It seems like it will lend itself better to "feeling" and seeing what your doing. Read the thread on the other forum about "Polishing contoured surfaces" and see how the guy describes the "feel' in post #5.

When I get the flap wheel mastered, I'll graduate to the next level, working my way up the amperage chain. Pretty soon, 15 amp, 2-1/4 HP ANGLE GRINDER shaving off a few 1/10,000th of an inch with the precision of a surgeon...boy it'll be a thing of beauty!!
I scratched the idea of using the flap sanding wheel for the dremel tool. The more I thought about paying $8 for the thing, and having only two grit choices, 80 and 120grit, I decided to use the sandpaper and equipment I already had. I decided to give my Ryobi random orbital a try. The 100% hand sanding method I used prior HAD TO GO. Took too long and was too tedious.

Here is the setup I came up with to hold the Ryobi so that I could control with work piece with two hands.

[ATTACH]3695[/ATTACH]


With the knob pieces so small, it&#8217]3696[/ATTACH]


I put the mirror and sandpaper up on a 2”x 3” so that I could rotate the part without the “wings” hitting. I rubbed the part against the sandpaper which stayed down of the 2” x 3”. That was the best way to keep it true.


[ATTACH]3697[/ATTACH]


Using the sander to get through the surface pits saved a boatload of time. Instead of it taking 4 hours to complete 1 piece through the buffing process, I was able to do 2 pieces in 2 hours. Just a couple pieces more to go and I am done. Here’s the finished feed stop knob. You'll notice a little divot on the top of the right wing, near the OD. My sander slipped in the vise. Bummer but I’ll live with it. Driving by 60 miles per hour, you’ll never notice it!! Well, that's it for polishing pics. You seen one, you've seen 'em all.



[ATTACH]3693[/ATTACH]
[ATTACH]3694[/ATTACH]


p.s. Use good quality sandpaper. It makes a difference. I had purchase some odd brand from Harbor Freight, real cheap, and it was exactly that…….REAL CHEAP. It just didn’t hold up. I would go through it twice as fast as the good stuff. Stick with name brand (i.e. Norton, 3M etc.)
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Mike
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