1956 Mark V restoration

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russsaw
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1956 Mark V restoration

Post by russsaw »

Hello Everyone. My 86 year old Grandpa gave me his Shopsmith Mark V last month. He bought it new in 1956. I think it is a really think it is a well designed tool and I would like to restore it so that I can use it to make musical instruments.

The Mark V has been stored for years and has the usual rust built up.

Today I removed the headstock and am trying to remove the way tubes but so far I can only get one off. Any recommendations on how to get it off. I got stuck at step one.

I plan on taking apart the headstock, cleaning and oiling it, perhaps updating the quill to a double bearing, and also repainting. I am trying to find a cheap battery charger so that I can do Electrolysis on some of the parts.

As for the way tubes, once I get them off, I am gonna place them in a PVC tube with a potatoe and see how that science experiment goes. I already have the four 3" PVC pipes and four potatoes.

Any suggestions on how to remove that way tube I would apprcieate. I used wd40 on it. and also reattached the the other end of the way tube to it's joing mount and tapped it with a hammer. no sucess.

Thank a lot. Can't wait to get started
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

Russ,

Welcome! Glad to hear more there are more out there wanting to restore a "family heirloom" like your dad's SS. I picked up my dad's over Thanksgiving and am going through the same process myself. My SS was sitting for a long time and had dirt dobber nests all over it that concealed the set screws that hold the way tubes on. Once I removed the crud and applied enough penetrating oil the tubes came right out. I had soaked this thing several times over a week or so before I began disassembly. So between making sure the set screws are loosened and you have soaked it with enough penetrating oil the only thing left to do is gently whack a rubber or wooden mallet (or a 2x4) against the cast aluminum. I like Liquid Wrench penetrating oil but a lot of guys speak very highly of PB Blaster. WD-40 just doesn't have the same penetrating properties. You can see my progress at this thread, although I'm not much ahead of you. At the rate I'm going, you'll pass me up in no time.

Here are a couple of other GREAT threads for restoration projects:
mikyd's 1955 Greenie
damagi's 1955 GreenieJerry's 1955 Greenie

These Sawdust Sessions are great for the beginning of restoration:

#21 Bargain or Basketcase
#22 Cleaning and Restoration
#23 Rebuilding the Drive Train
#24 http://www.shopsmithacademy.com/SS_Arch ... rn_Pt4.htm

Be sure to check out the PDF docs that accompany each video on the "blackboard" area to the right of the video screen.

Here are some instructions on disassembly and cleaning.

Good luck and if doesn't work, just let us know. There's plenty of knowledge here.
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

Also, here's some quick instructions for uploading photos. Please upload lots as you go! I would love to see your progress as we rehab our family machines.
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
russsaw
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Post by russsaw »

Well I managed to get the stuck way bar loosened so that it will turn about half way. I thought since it was turning that I'd be able to get it off if I tapped the attached "Way Tube Tie Bar" at the other end. Well I tapped a little to hard (more like whacked) and I broke the "way tube tie bar"

still haven't gotten that way tube out yet though


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russsaw
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Post by russsaw »

I got it. jeeeeezzzzzz :)
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ddvann79
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Need new tiebar?

Post by ddvann79 »

Ohhhhh Noooooo! :( Looks dry as a bone! Did you apply some penetrating oil?

Maybe it's time for some JB Weld. Check out mickyd's broken casting fix. After paint you can't tell anything was ever wrong. Can anyone out there help russaw with a new tie bar if need be?

Dusty has told me on several occasions, "No Hammers." :o
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

Welcome to the forum russsaw. Your now have a classic machine that will clean up fine and will last you your lifetime. I can't give you any heat for your disassembly 'fubar' because, well, schtuff happens. We call it 'reverse restoration'! I've done it.....a couple times. I've learn patience and asking questions since.

For your next restoration, the secret to taking the stubborn tie bars off is gentle alternating tapping, going from one way tube side to the other. The tie bar jams very easily so it has to come off virtually dead straight.

Get yourself some 'PB Blaster' from Home Depot to make disassembly of rusty parts easier. Many folks on the forum also rant about a product called 'Kroil'. Didn't work at all for me but maybe I got a bad batch.

Post lots of pics as you proceed. You'll be amazed at the timely help you'll get. Plus, we all love pictures. :D Also, update you profile so we know where you are.
Mike
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

russsaw wrote:Well I managed to get the stuck way bar loosened so that it will turn about half way. I thought since it was turning that I'd be able to get it off if I tapped the attached "Way Tube Tie Bar" at the other end. Well I tapped a little to hard (more like whacked) and I broke the "way tube tie bar"

still haven't gotten that way tube out yet though


[ATTACH]10873[/ATTACH]
These be common and reasonable(usually) on e-bay. Any color/model will work except the 10E/ER version. IMHO replacement is preferable to jb-weld etc.
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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derekdarling
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Broken Castings

Post by derekdarling »

Anyone here hear of Dave Gingery? He had this set of books that took you from a charcoal-fired furnace to melt aluminium, all the way to building a machine shop out of, essentially, scrap metal.

The SS uses aluminium castings, and a broken casting that needs to bear weight needs to be metal, not JB-Weld. A broken and JB-Weld repaired casting, however, would make a great pattern to make a green-sand mold to cast a new part!

I'm just saying:cool:.


Derek in Surrey, B.C.
Derek Darling
Surrey, B.C. Canada
10ERs, other stuff, you know.
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ddvann79
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Replacement, Recasting or Brazing

Post by ddvann79 »

derekdarling wrote:Anyone here hear of Dave Gingery? He had this set of books that took you from a charcoal-fired furnace to melt aluminium, all the way to building a machine shop out of, essentially, scrap metal.

The SS uses aluminium castings, and a broken casting that needs to bear weight needs to be metal, not JB-Weld. A broken and JB-Weld repaired casting, however, would make a great pattern to make a green-sand mold to cast a new part!

I'm just saying:cool:.


Derek in Surrey, B.C.
That makes good sense, Derek. As JPG has stated in other posts, the JB Weld probably won't fail but the bond to the metal can. Mr. Gingery sounds like a man after my own heart. I've long wanted a forgeand a foundry. Here's a pretty cool method for sand casting aluminum parts in your back yard. Of course, I don't think a CNC router is necessary.

Maybe it's possible to braze this tie bar back together if Russ doesn't want to build a foundry. :D Products are out there such as mentioned in this thread for brazing and "welding" with just a propane torch and rod. But that tie bar looks pretty smashed.

The cheapest course of action (and least headache) is probably buying another one from eBay for $15 plus shipping.

How's it coming, Russsaw?

I just realized I'm attempting to live vicariously through you guys with some of these posts. "Hey, you should do xyz!" Maybe I just need to break something and so I can do it myself but I'm sure breakage will happen sooner or later. :p
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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