1962 Goldie Disassembly

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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

ddvann79 wrote:I was able to remove the stud.........

There is enough space between the collar and the nut that I think I'll use a thin nut outside the collar and tighten the two of them together to keep the collar from vibrating loose instead of punching new indents. .....
Not sure the thin nut approach will allow enough room for the handle to work propoerly but if it does, great idea. If not, don't fret about the indent you'll revert too. Next time the beast will have to be taken apart will be 2060 when your great-great grandson has to restore it again. :D
Mike
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

Re an earlier post re bearing sizes on an Emerson motor. The Fan end bearing is 17mm x 40mm x 12mm(6203zz). The switch end is 5/8" x 40mm x 12mm.

All other SS motors that I am aware of use 17x40x12 bearings in both ends. IMHO rubber sealed is preferable, but there are differing opinions. In any event sealed is required. Rubber seems to keep out the saw dust better(opinion again).

Part numbers change with manufacturers. Best to go by dimensions!!!!!

BTW that cracked stuff on the wires is 'varnish'! Not a concern(it is oversplash from varnishing the other stuff).

Sorry to not being able to tell you this earlier, but backing the trunion lock nut out fully until it contacts the staked stop, then 'carefully' applying more torque will back the stud out of the trunion. Works on a Model 10 also!
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

JPG40504 wrote: Sorry to not being able to tell you this earlier, but backing the trunion lock nut out fully until it contacts the staked stop, then 'carefully' applying more torque will back the stud out of the trunnion. Works on a Model 10 also!

Good grief, Charlie Brown! Why didn't I think of that? I was thinking about using that the same principle to keep the stop on so I should have thought to use it to get the stud out and avoid filing off the indents all together.

As for the bearings, this is an A. O. Smith motor. The bearings on both ends of the rotor are marked 77203 so a 6203 double shielded or sealed should do the trick. I do believe it is a 5/8" shaft, however. I like your thought process on going with sealed, especially if the cost isn't much more.
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:Good grief, Charlie Brown! Why didn't I think of that? I was thinking about using that the same principle to keep the stop on so I should have thought to use it to get the stud out and avoid filing off the indents all together.

As for the bearings, this is an A. O. Smith motor. The bearings on both ends of the rotor are marked 77203 so a 6203 double shielded or sealed should do the trick. I do believe it is a 5/8" shaft, however. I like your thought process on going with sealed, especially if the cost isn't much more.

Think again! The area where the bearings go IS 17mm. The end where the sheaves slide ARE 5/8".
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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Curse my cheapness

Post by ddvann79 »

JPG40504 wrote:Think again! The area where the bearings go IS 17mm. The end where the sheaves slide ARE 5/8".
17 millimeter = 0.66929133858 inch
5/8 inch = 0.625 inch

So is that why there is a sleeve between the bearing and shaft on one end of the shaft? I suppose the standard 6203 would have an ID that's too big. I ordered them last night! The 17mm ID bearings were $2.00 while the 5/8 ID bearings were $6!
Dalton
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1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

WHOA!!!!!

You have an A.O.Smith motor. Only the EMERSON motor needs a 5/8" rear bearing. I do hope you can rescind(modify) that order!!!

The spacer positions the armature.(or are you referring to one on the outer side of the bearing?)



ddvann79 wrote:17 millimeter = 0.66929133858 inch
5/8 inch = 0.625 inch

So is that why there is a sleeve between the bearing and shaft on one end of the shaft? I suppose the standard 6203 would have an ID that's too big. I ordered them last night! The 17mm ID bearings were $2.00 while the 5/8 ID bearings were $6!
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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nuhobby
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More Tips for the Rebuild

Post by nuhobby »

Hi,

Some things bear mentioning as you progress. Great job so far!

The motor has a "sheave spacer" holding the Fan Sheave out a little bit on the motor shaft. The early, thinnish spacers were prone to collapse if used or abused too much. To ward off future trouble, go ahead and order p/n 504205 Sheave Spacer (they're cheap!) which is stockier. Also, the setscrew holding the Fan Sheave to the motor shaft needs a nice "bite" on its end, and a nice rattle-proof threading retention. New p/n 513056 cup-point setscrew has the "bite" and has the dab of loctite already on the threads. You may also want to examine the Long Key upon which the Floating Sheave moves back and forth. If worn too much, it can be a source of rattle or other complications. New Key p/n 504209 is again cheap.

Not sure how your Idler Shaft will be doing. Chances are its bearings are pretty tired, too. The original idler-shaft design has been obsoleted on the Shopsmith parts inventory. The new style idler-shaft requires also the latest Eccentric Bushing p/n 515616 which is not cheap! A seller on e$ay offers on older-style-design idler-shaft which is claimed to be compatible with your existing older-style eccentric bushing. Comments about inspecting the (Short) Key on the idler-shaft also apply here.
Chris
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ddvann79
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Lube

Post by ddvann79 »

nuhobby wrote:Hi,

Some things bear mentioning as you progress. Great job so far! Thanks!

The motor has a "sheave spacer" holding the Fan Sheave out a little bit on the motor shaft. The early, thinnish spacers were prone to collapse if used or abused too much. To ward off future trouble, go ahead and order p/n 504205 Sheave Spacer (they're cheap!) which is stockier. Also, the setscrew holding the Fan Sheave to the motor shaft needs a nice "bite" on its end, and a nice rattle-proof threading retention. New p/n 513056 cup-point setscrew has the "bite" and has the dab of loctite already on the threads. You may also want to examine the Long Key upon which the Floating Sheave moves back and forth. If worn too much, it can be a source of rattle or other complications. New Key p/n 504209 is again cheap.
1. The keys look good. I've seen worse. Great point about the set screws. You can definitely tell where the screws bit into the keys. I'll probably just file off rough spots in the key and flip it over.

2. I finally decided to order new bearings last night from VBX. I received confirmation this morning that bearings for the motor, drive shaft and quill are all on their way. We'll see how well they work and I'll let everyone know one way or the other, with specs.

3. While I'm thinking about it, I was perusing my Christmas issue of the Woodworking Supply catalog and musing over their lubricant offerings. I grew up on 3-in-1 and WD-40. JPG recommends #10 3-in-1 oil for the sheaves. Nick Engler likes T-9 for general lubrication, but I don't want to pay $15 to $20 a can! So...
a. Which lubricant does everyone use for reassembly?
b. Do you use a different lubricant for oiling sheaves?
c. Would something like T-9 with a spray straw be good for lubing the sheaves since it is less likely to attract dust?


4. I've got all the cast components cleaned up and ready to strip. I've located Rustoleum Hammered Copper and Hammered Gold at my local Wally World (sorry, my wife's Wally World - she claimed it) in abundant supply, along with etching primer. This will have to wait until after our first round of holiday road trips.
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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dusty
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Post by dusty »

I can answer only one question because I lacl first hand knowledge of the other oils.

I used to use the Shopsmith oil can (I think it contained 3in1) but as I began to run out I switched to Zoom Spout which is a turbine oil. I get mine at Ace Hardware.

Whatever you decide to use - Use It ---- regularly.
"Making Sawdust Safely"
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

Zoom Spout 'turbine' oil. Like Dusty said, do not skimp!
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╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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