1962 Goldie Disassembly

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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:For example, the power switch is difficult to get around the toggle. The miter gauge have that curved slot in it. The sheaves are loaded with gunk and it's so far I can't get in between all the slots. The indentations on the locking handles and lettering are filled with gunk and resin in places, as are the rack teeth on the table tubes. Then there are all the pin, bolt, and screw holes that have sticky grit in them after sanding and stripping.

Some of my issues are stains more than just filth but it all sticks to the parts and has been a challenge to remove. Yesterday I found that Citrus Strip will take rust of tubes (don't worry, I have a gallon of Evaporust).

So far, my best friends have been brass brushes, tooth brush, mineral spirits, a fine wire wheel on my grinder (on its last leg), soft paint removal wheel, scratch awl, and a chip brush. But those brushes are just too wide to get into many places. Maybe I'm going overboard but this is the first time I've ever tried to make a machine not only work well but look good too.
There is no overboard if appearance be a goal.;)
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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First Paint

Post by ddvann79 »

After lots of Citrus Strip, brass brushes and toothpaste (thanks JPG - works great), I've started testing this Rustoleum Hammered Copper on a few pieces. I primed first with Self Etching primer after cleaning up the components with mineral spirits. The pinholes in this first coat of paint show the tint of the primer.

[ATTACH]11095[/ATTACH]

I'm not too concerned about a consistent coat. I observed quite a bit of variation in the factory finish, which I didn't notice until I began focusing on paint removal.
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The base really isn't this bright but the flash went off in this shot, giving it a brighter appearance.

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This is some crazy paint and I really don't like painting on vertical surfaces with it. The layer has to be almost runny for it to pit and make the hammered surface. At least with normal paint the desired look can be achieved with multiple thin layers. I'm not so confident thin layers are the way to go with this but we will see. I have a heavy trigger finger, so to speak, so I got some runs on one side of the base. I'll probably sand that down and repaint with it standing on end. I'm interested to see how the second coat goes on.

I still have a good bit of body work and paint removal on other components but I've been itching to see how this paint would look. I may experiment with wet sanding the primer and compare that to no primer at all to see what kind of adhesion I get. I noticed mickyd had some issues getting his Verde Green to pit as it should when applying on primer but I didn't notice much of a problem with the Hammered Copper.
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Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

Light coats do not get the hammered look!

The can MUST be shaked often(the paint is a 'mixture' that creates the hammered effect).

Yes vertical surfaces are prone to running since a fairly heavy coat is required for the 'effect'.

Does require some 'technique', but you seem to have mastered it.

You can 'spot' reapply after 24 hrs. The can says soon after initial coat, but that tends to get runny.

The 'effect' develops on horizontal surfaces better than vertical surfaces. You can rotate the part and paint a different surface if ya wait 10-15 minutes after initial painting(it sets enough to not run). This is a way to work around 'vertical' surfaces.

Not too shabby for an initial attempt. Actually the 'heavy handed' application helped!

P.S. Notice those surfaces not originally painted and mask them off.(trunion scale/clamp area).
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

JPG40504 wrote:Light coats do not get the hammered look!

The can MUST be shaken often(the paint is a 'mixture' that creates the hammered effect).
...
You can 'spot' reapply after 24 hrs. The can says soon after initial coat, but that tends to get runny.

The 'effect' develops on horizontal surfaces better than vertical surfaces. You can rotate the part and paint a different surface if ya wait 10-15 minutes after initial painting(it sets enough to not run). This is a way to work around 'vertical' surfaces.
...

P.S. Notice those surfaces not originally painted and mask them off.(trunion scale/clamp area).
Thanks for the tips, JPG. I just followed the directions on the can that say to overlap passes. It also talks about using a specific rust prevention primer but all I had was self etching primer. Besides, the parts I painted are aluminum.

It dawned on me this morning that the dimpling effect that leaves pinholes could be to my advantage for toning down the bright hue of the gold paint. Maybe if a tan undercoat was applied it would show through the dimples in the hammered gold and result a duller color. I'll experiment with it.

...waiting until the 15th to use my $20 off coupon at HF for the bearing puller. I can hardly stand it. :rolleyes:
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:Thanks for the tips, JPG. I just followed the directions on the can that say to overlap passes. It also talks about using a specific rust prevention primer but all I had was self etching primer. Besides, the parts I painted are aluminum.

It dawned on me this morning that the dimpling effect that leaves pinholes could be to my advantage for toning down the bright hue of the gold paint. Maybe if a tan undercoat was applied it would show through the dimples in the hammered gold and result a duller color. I'll experiment with it.

...waiting until the 15th to use my $20 off coupon at HF for the bearing puller. I can hardly stand it. :rolleyes:

It Won't(at least I doubt it).

Better anyway!

Why do you have to wait til the 15th? ($)? Thought they be 20%.????
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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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ddvann79
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Post by ddvann79 »

JPG40504 wrote: Why do you have to wait til the 15th? ($)? Thought they be 20%.????
Good question. After reviewing this coupon I found is from 12/15/09 to 12/31/10, not 12/15/10 to 12/31/10. So I'll get it today... maybe.
Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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ddvann79
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Hammered Gold Paint Test

Post by ddvann79 »

I had the idea that maybe the hue of the Rustoleum Hammered Gold could be toned down some by first applying a base color of tan. I printed out various colors ranging from light red to brown on one sheet of paper and sprayed the hammered gold over it.

While this is ink that is being covered instead of paint or primer, I think the results provide enough of an idea of what would happen. The hammered gold dimpled well on some colors and not at all on others. I assume this has to do with how much ink was on the paper and it's chemical composition. The base color showed through in 50% of the trial colors. The moral of the story is clear, though. With one exception, instead of toning down the bright gold color the result was a two-tone effect. The different colors were contrasted, instead of blending.

The dark brown color is the only one that really appeared to change the tone/hue of the hammered gold but it made the total color darker, instead of lightening it. This is a similar effect that I observed with the relatively dark self-etching primer undercoat.

[ATTACH]11119[/ATTACH]
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Dalton
Fort Worth, Texas
1962 MK 5 #373733 Goldie
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:Good question. After reviewing this coupon I found is from 12/15/09 to 12/31/10, not 12/15/10 to 12/31/10. So I'll get it today... maybe.

Interesting! "Click to print" "Share" "Original only, no photocopies or computer printouts" Any body else sense a lack of consistency?

My more recent 20% off coupons exclude sales items.:confused:

Hope you like the odor of camphor!:D
╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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JPG
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Post by JPG »

ddvann79 wrote:I had the idea that maybe the hue of the Rustoleum Hammered Gold could be toned down some by first applying a base color of tan. I printed out various colors ranging from light red to brown on one sheet of paper and sprayed the hammered gold over it.

While this is ink that is being covered instead of paint or primer, I think the results provide enough of an idea of what would happen. The hammered gold dimpled well on some colors and not at all on others. I assume this has to do with how much ink was on the paper and it's chemical composition. The base color showed through in 50% of the trial colors. The moral of the story is clear, though. With one exception, instead of toning down the bright gold color the result was a two-tone effect. The different colors were contrasted, instead of blending.

The dark brown color is the only one that really appeared to change the tone/hue of the hammered gold but it made the total color darker, instead of lightening it. This is a similar effect that I observed with the relatively dark self-etching primer undercoat.

[ATTACH]11119[/ATTACH]
I am quite surprised it worked as well as it did!

I be assuming the paper is porous and the printed ink be soluble!

I would not have expected any 'hammertoning'.

The original 'brown' is darker than the gold. Sorta like the color of partially oxidized copper but lighter.
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╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E[/size](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
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mickyd
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Post by mickyd »

ddvann79 wrote:I had the idea that maybe the hue of the Rustoleum Hammered Gold could be toned down some by first applying a base color of tan. I printed out various colors ranging from light red to brown on one sheet of paper and sprayed the hammered gold over it.

While this is ink that is being covered instead of paint or primer, I think the results provide enough of an idea of what would happen. The hammered gold dimpled well on some colors and not at all on others. I assume this has to do with how much ink was on the paper and it's chemical composition. The base color showed through in 50% of the trial colors. The moral of the story is clear, though. With one exception, instead of toning down the bright gold color the result was a two-tone effect. The different colors were contrasted, instead of blending.

The dark brown color is the only one that really appeared to change the tone/hue of the hammered gold but it made the total color darker, instead of lightening it. This is a similar effect that I observed with the relatively dark self-etching primer undercoat.

[ATTACH]11119[/ATTACH]
Since you like to play as I do, duplicate my primed vs. unprimedwork. Unprimed steel sheet metal DEFINITELY resulted in a a more uniform, fuller texture. I didn't prime my Mark 5 steel parts because of this. Rustoleum had conflicting technical information on whether primer was needed or not so I went with no primer. Can't attest for longevity yet but almost 2 years later, it's still perfect.

I also experimented with not using self etch primer on some of my aluminum parts as discussed in this thread just to see if hammered paint bonds well by itself to aluminum. Again here, to date, looks great.
Mike
Sunny San Diego
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